Treatment of reperfusion injury in dogs with experimentally induced gastric dilatation-volvulus

Gary C. Lantz From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Lantz) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Badylak, Hiles, Arkin), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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Stephen F. Badylak From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Lantz) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Badylak, Hiles, Arkin), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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Michael C. Hiles From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Lantz) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Badylak, Hiles, Arkin), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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Terri E. Arkin From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Lantz) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Badylak, Hiles, Arkin), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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SUMMARY

In dogs, gastric dilatation-volvulus (gdv) is characterized by cardiogenic shock, with resulting hypoperfusion. Treatment goals include reperfusion of transiently ischemic tissues, which indicates that reperfusion injury may be a factor in the physiopathogenesis of gdv. Recently, we obtained data that indicate that reperfusion injury may be involved in experimentally induced gdv. Using this gdv model, we evaluated mortality in 24 dogs of 4 equal groups, treated with deferoxamine (an iron chelator), dimethylsulfoxide (a free radical scavenger), a combination of the 2 drugs, or isotonic saline solution. All 6 dogs that were given deferoxamine survived; however, 3 dogs of the dimethylsulfoxide-treated group, 2 dogs of the combination-treated group, and 4 dogs of the saline-treated group died. Results of the study indicate that mortality associated with experimentally induced gdv is reduced by appropriate and timely pharmacologic intervention to prevent or attenuate reperfusion injury, and that deferoxamine may be more effective than dimethylsulfoxide.

SUMMARY

In dogs, gastric dilatation-volvulus (gdv) is characterized by cardiogenic shock, with resulting hypoperfusion. Treatment goals include reperfusion of transiently ischemic tissues, which indicates that reperfusion injury may be a factor in the physiopathogenesis of gdv. Recently, we obtained data that indicate that reperfusion injury may be involved in experimentally induced gdv. Using this gdv model, we evaluated mortality in 24 dogs of 4 equal groups, treated with deferoxamine (an iron chelator), dimethylsulfoxide (a free radical scavenger), a combination of the 2 drugs, or isotonic saline solution. All 6 dogs that were given deferoxamine survived; however, 3 dogs of the dimethylsulfoxide-treated group, 2 dogs of the combination-treated group, and 4 dogs of the saline-treated group died. Results of the study indicate that mortality associated with experimentally induced gdv is reduced by appropriate and timely pharmacologic intervention to prevent or attenuate reperfusion injury, and that deferoxamine may be more effective than dimethylsulfoxide.

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