Evaluation of sodium carboxymethylcellulose for prevention of adhesions after uterine trauma in ewes

H. D. Moll From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Moll, Wolfe, Schumacher) and the Department of Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5522.

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D. F. Wolfe From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Moll, Wolfe, Schumacher) and the Department of Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5522.

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J. Schumacher From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Moll, Wolfe, Schumacher) and the Department of Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5522.

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J. C. Wright From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Moll, Wolfe, Schumacher) and the Department of Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5522.

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Summary

Efficacy of a 1% solution of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cmc) infused into the peritoneal cavity of ewes was evaluated for prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions resulting from surgery of the reproductive tract. Six ewes were assigned to each of 4 groups. Group-1 ewes were controls that underwent ventral midline celiotomy and exploration of the abdominal viscera. Group-2 ewes were treated similarly to group-1 ewes, except that a 1% solution of cmc (14 ml/kg of body weight) was infused into the peritoneal cavity. This group was studied to determine whether cmc would cause changes in the peritoneal cavity. Group-3 comprised ewes representing a uterine trauma model. Ewes underwent abdominal exploration, but in addition had a standard embryo collection technique performed on 1 uterine horn and hysterotomy performed on the opposite uterine horn. Group-4 ewes were treated like group-3 ewes, except that, similar to treatment of group-2 ewes, cmc was infused into the peritoneal cavity. All ewes were euthanatized and necropsied 12 to 14 days after surgery.

Abdominal adhesions were evaluated, and an adhesion severity score was assigned to each ewe on the basis of number and severity of the adhesions. Ewes of all groups had abdominal adhesions. Significantly (P < 0.05) lower adhesion score was observed in ewes given cmc (groups 2 and 4) than in the adhesion model (group 3). Significant difference was not observed in adhesion score when groups 1, 2, or 4 were compared. Though not statistically significant, fewer adhesions were observed in ewes of groups 2 and 4 than in group-1 ewes.

Summary

Efficacy of a 1% solution of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cmc) infused into the peritoneal cavity of ewes was evaluated for prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions resulting from surgery of the reproductive tract. Six ewes were assigned to each of 4 groups. Group-1 ewes were controls that underwent ventral midline celiotomy and exploration of the abdominal viscera. Group-2 ewes were treated similarly to group-1 ewes, except that a 1% solution of cmc (14 ml/kg of body weight) was infused into the peritoneal cavity. This group was studied to determine whether cmc would cause changes in the peritoneal cavity. Group-3 comprised ewes representing a uterine trauma model. Ewes underwent abdominal exploration, but in addition had a standard embryo collection technique performed on 1 uterine horn and hysterotomy performed on the opposite uterine horn. Group-4 ewes were treated like group-3 ewes, except that, similar to treatment of group-2 ewes, cmc was infused into the peritoneal cavity. All ewes were euthanatized and necropsied 12 to 14 days after surgery.

Abdominal adhesions were evaluated, and an adhesion severity score was assigned to each ewe on the basis of number and severity of the adhesions. Ewes of all groups had abdominal adhesions. Significantly (P < 0.05) lower adhesion score was observed in ewes given cmc (groups 2 and 4) than in the adhesion model (group 3). Significant difference was not observed in adhesion score when groups 1, 2, or 4 were compared. Though not statistically significant, fewer adhesions were observed in ewes of groups 2 and 4 than in group-1 ewes.

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