Analgesia and behavioral responses of dogs given oxymorphone-acepromazine and meperidine-acepromazine after methoxyflurane and halothane anesthesia

Donald C. Sawyer From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Donald C. Sawyer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Richard H. Rech From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Richard H. Rech in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Thomas Adams From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Thomas Adams in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Robert A. Durham From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Robert A. Durham in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Marlee A. Richter From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Marlee A. Richter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Elaine L. Striler From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Sawyer) and Pharmacology and Toxicology (Sawyer, Rech), and the Department of Physiology (Adams), College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1316.

Search for other papers by Elaine L. Striler in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

This study was designed to test analgesia, duration, and cardiovascular changes induced by meperidine (mep) and oxymorphone (oxy) following methoxyflurane (mof) and halothane (hal) anesthesia. Eight healthy dogs were given atropine and acepromazine, and anesthesia was induced with thiamylal and maintained with 1.5 minimal alveolar concentration of mof or hal for 1 hour during controlled ventilation. Eight treatments were given with each anesthetic: 3 with mep (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg, iv), 3 with oxymorphone (oxy; 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/kg, iv), and 2 placebos with sterile water. Test drugs were given at the end of anesthesia when early signs of recovery were evident. Minimal threshold stimulus/response nociception was assessed by use of an inflatable soft plastic colonic balloon. Blood pressures and pulse rate were measured with a noninvasive monitor. Meperidine and oxy were found to be effective analgesics and could be reversed with naloxone. Intravenous administration of 2.0 mg of mep/kg provided analgesia for 36 ± 6 minutes and 39 ± 15 minutes after mof and hal, respectively. In contrast, oxy was effective at all 3 doses with effects of iv administration of 0.2 mg of oxy/kg lasting 154 ± 13 minutes and 152 ± 12 minutes, after mof and hal, respectively. Analgesia could not be demonstrated after anesthesia for acepromazine, mof, or hal. Blood pressure was not changed by either anesthetic nor was it influenced by mep or oxy. Pulse rate was significantly depressed by the higher doses of oxy following hal, but was not changed by mep following either anesthetic. This study demonstrated the longer duration of analgesia of oxy. In addition, we could not find that analgesia was provided by either mof or hal following recovery from anesthesia.

Summary

This study was designed to test analgesia, duration, and cardiovascular changes induced by meperidine (mep) and oxymorphone (oxy) following methoxyflurane (mof) and halothane (hal) anesthesia. Eight healthy dogs were given atropine and acepromazine, and anesthesia was induced with thiamylal and maintained with 1.5 minimal alveolar concentration of mof or hal for 1 hour during controlled ventilation. Eight treatments were given with each anesthetic: 3 with mep (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg, iv), 3 with oxymorphone (oxy; 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/kg, iv), and 2 placebos with sterile water. Test drugs were given at the end of anesthesia when early signs of recovery were evident. Minimal threshold stimulus/response nociception was assessed by use of an inflatable soft plastic colonic balloon. Blood pressures and pulse rate were measured with a noninvasive monitor. Meperidine and oxy were found to be effective analgesics and could be reversed with naloxone. Intravenous administration of 2.0 mg of mep/kg provided analgesia for 36 ± 6 minutes and 39 ± 15 minutes after mof and hal, respectively. In contrast, oxy was effective at all 3 doses with effects of iv administration of 0.2 mg of oxy/kg lasting 154 ± 13 minutes and 152 ± 12 minutes, after mof and hal, respectively. Analgesia could not be demonstrated after anesthesia for acepromazine, mof, or hal. Blood pressure was not changed by either anesthetic nor was it influenced by mep or oxy. Pulse rate was significantly depressed by the higher doses of oxy following hal, but was not changed by mep following either anesthetic. This study demonstrated the longer duration of analgesia of oxy. In addition, we could not find that analgesia was provided by either mof or hal following recovery from anesthesia.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 61 61 13
PDF Downloads 31 31 1
Advertisement