Age-related effects on motor nerve conduction velocity in chickens

Rodney S. Bagley From the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Simon J. Wheeler From the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Robert L. James From the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Summary

Compound motor-nerve action potentials evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the proximal and distal aspects of the tibial nerve were evaluated in chickens 1 to 15 weeks old. Motor-nerve conduction velocity increased from a mean of 22.6 m/s at week 1 to a mean of 52.7 m/s at week 15. The increase in conduction velocity was greatest for the first few weeks, and reached a plateau at 10 weeks Subcutaneous limb temperature, limb length, and proximal latency measurements also increased with age; however, distal latency measurements were not significantly influenced by age. A quadratic equation was calculated to predict mean motor-nerve conduction velocity for maturing chickens.

Summary

Compound motor-nerve action potentials evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the proximal and distal aspects of the tibial nerve were evaluated in chickens 1 to 15 weeks old. Motor-nerve conduction velocity increased from a mean of 22.6 m/s at week 1 to a mean of 52.7 m/s at week 15. The increase in conduction velocity was greatest for the first few weeks, and reached a plateau at 10 weeks Subcutaneous limb temperature, limb length, and proximal latency measurements also increased with age; however, distal latency measurements were not significantly influenced by age. A quadratic equation was calculated to predict mean motor-nerve conduction velocity for maturing chickens.

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