High-resolution computed tomography of the mammalian lung

Qihang Chen From the Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.

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Jeffrey S. Klein From the Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.

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Gordon Gamsu From the Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.

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W. Richard Webb From the Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143.

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Summary

High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed in 21 isolated animal lungs, from 4 mammalian species (pigs, rabbits, dogs, sheep). Gross and subgross central and peripheral lung morphology was determined by HRCT. Three distinct types of lungs can be identified, principally based on the extent of interlobular septal development; the relationship of major vessels to airways; and the thickness of the visceral pleura. Type-I lung is found in pigs, sheep, and cattle; type-II lung is found in rabbits, dogs, cats, and monkeys; and type-IH lung is found in human beings and horses.1 These mammalian lungs were compared with human lungs. The potential use of HRCT to investigate specific human lung diseases in the aforementioned species also was considered.

Summary

High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed in 21 isolated animal lungs, from 4 mammalian species (pigs, rabbits, dogs, sheep). Gross and subgross central and peripheral lung morphology was determined by HRCT. Three distinct types of lungs can be identified, principally based on the extent of interlobular septal development; the relationship of major vessels to airways; and the thickness of the visceral pleura. Type-I lung is found in pigs, sheep, and cattle; type-II lung is found in rabbits, dogs, cats, and monkeys; and type-IH lung is found in human beings and horses.1 These mammalian lungs were compared with human lungs. The potential use of HRCT to investigate specific human lung diseases in the aforementioned species also was considered.

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