Morphologic features and hydrophobicity of the cell surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

Gustavo C. Zielinski From the Veterinary Medical Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Search for other papers by Gustavo C. Zielinski in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
and
Richard F. Ross From the Veterinary Medical Research Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Search for other papers by Richard F. Ross in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Cell surface hydrophobicity of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was evaluated by phase partitioning in a hydro-carbon-aqueous mixture, by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and by salting out with ammonium sulfate. Results obtained by use of these techniques gave evidence that the cell surface of M hyopneumoniae is weakly hydrophobic, compared with strongly hydrophobic Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and hydrophilic Klebsiella pneumoniae. After treatment of the organisms with trypsin, M hyopneumoniae became less hydrophobic as measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Significant changes in hydrophobicity were not seen after periodate treatment. Electron microscopy of M hyopneumoniae treated with polycationic ferritin revealed an intermediate, compact, unlabeled layer between the cytoplasmic membrane and an external, heavily labeled layer. Electron microscopy of ferritin-labeled M hyopneu-moniae after treatment with trypsin or periodate revealed the intermediate layer to be composed of a trypsin-sensitive protein(s). The outer layer was made of periodate-sensitive carbohydrate(s). Therefore, it appears that proteins in the intermediate layer confer at least part of the total hydrophobicity of the mycoplasmal cell and may contribute to adherence of M hyopneumoniae to target respiratory cells by hydrophobic interactions.

Summary

Cell surface hydrophobicity of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was evaluated by phase partitioning in a hydro-carbon-aqueous mixture, by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and by salting out with ammonium sulfate. Results obtained by use of these techniques gave evidence that the cell surface of M hyopneumoniae is weakly hydrophobic, compared with strongly hydrophobic Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and hydrophilic Klebsiella pneumoniae. After treatment of the organisms with trypsin, M hyopneumoniae became less hydrophobic as measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Significant changes in hydrophobicity were not seen after periodate treatment. Electron microscopy of M hyopneumoniae treated with polycationic ferritin revealed an intermediate, compact, unlabeled layer between the cytoplasmic membrane and an external, heavily labeled layer. Electron microscopy of ferritin-labeled M hyopneu-moniae after treatment with trypsin or periodate revealed the intermediate layer to be composed of a trypsin-sensitive protein(s). The outer layer was made of periodate-sensitive carbohydrate(s). Therefore, it appears that proteins in the intermediate layer confer at least part of the total hydrophobicity of the mycoplasmal cell and may contribute to adherence of M hyopneumoniae to target respiratory cells by hydrophobic interactions.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 43 43 11
PDF Downloads 10 10 4
Advertisement