Use of tissue plasminogen activator for intraocular fibrinolysis in dogs

Paul A. Gerding Jr. From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine (Gerding, Vasaune, Yack) and Department of Medical Information Science (Essex-Sorlie), College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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 DVM, MS
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Diane Essex-Sorlie From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine (Gerding, Vasaune, Yack) and Department of Medical Information Science (Essex-Sorlie), College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Steven Vasaune From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine (Gerding, Vasaune, Yack) and Department of Medical Information Science (Essex-Sorlie), College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Robert Yack From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine (Gerding, Vasaune, Yack) and Department of Medical Information Science (Essex-Sorlie), College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Summary

Fibrin clots were induced in eyes of dogs by injection of autogenous citrated plasma into the anterior chamber. Twenty-four hours after clot formation, 0.01 ml of tissue plasminogen activator at a concentration of 1 μg/100 μl (group 1, n = 5) or 25 μg/100 μl (group 2, n = 5) was injected into 1 anterior chamber of each dog. The contralateral eye served as a nontreated control. Serial photographs were taken of the fibrin clots after intracameral injection of tissue plasminogen activator. Computerized morphometric analysis was then used to evaluate changes in cross-sectional surface area of the fibrin clot. Significant (P < 0.001) fibrin-clot lysis was detected in treated eyes of group-2 dogs, but was not found in treated eyes of group-1 dogs. A mean decrease of > 90% in clot surface area was detected by 120 minutes after injection in treated eyes of group-2 dogs.

Summary

Fibrin clots were induced in eyes of dogs by injection of autogenous citrated plasma into the anterior chamber. Twenty-four hours after clot formation, 0.01 ml of tissue plasminogen activator at a concentration of 1 μg/100 μl (group 1, n = 5) or 25 μg/100 μl (group 2, n = 5) was injected into 1 anterior chamber of each dog. The contralateral eye served as a nontreated control. Serial photographs were taken of the fibrin clots after intracameral injection of tissue plasminogen activator. Computerized morphometric analysis was then used to evaluate changes in cross-sectional surface area of the fibrin clot. Significant (P < 0.001) fibrin-clot lysis was detected in treated eyes of group-2 dogs, but was not found in treated eyes of group-1 dogs. A mean decrease of > 90% in clot surface area was detected by 120 minutes after injection in treated eyes of group-2 dogs.

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