Immunologic responses in healthy random-source cats fed N,N-dimethylglycine-supplemented diets

Richard C. Weiss From the Scott-Ritchey Research Center and the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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 VMD, PhD

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Summary

The immunomodulatory capacities of N,N-dimethylglycine (dmg) were examined in random-source cats. Blood mononuclear leukocytes of healthy adult cats that had negative results to tests for FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus were exposed in vitro to various concentrations of dmg (10 to 1,000 μg/ml) and were evaluated for proliferative responses to T- or B-cell phytomitogens. Although increased, mean lymphocyte blastogenic responses to phytolectins in dmg-treated cultures did not differ significantly from responses of untreated cultures. For in vivo studies, cats were given a solution containing either 100 mg of dmg or a control solution without dmg orally at 8 am and 6 pm for 40 consecutive days. On posttreatment day 24 and 25, mean blastogenic responses to phytolectins in dmg-treated and control cats inoculated 10 days earlier with an inactivated feline virus vaccine were similar. Cats given dmg and inoculated twice in a 3-week interval with a commercial vaccine containing inactivated feline herpesvirus-1 and feline calicivirus had significantly (P = 0.045) lower virus neutralizing serum antibody titers against feline herpesvirus-1, compared with titers of control cats, whereas feline calicivirus titers were similar in both groups. On day 25, mean serum interferon activity, induced after iv inoculation of Newcastle disease virus, was significantly (P = 0.021) lower in the dmg-treated cats.

Results of this study of dmg in healthy cats failed to demonstrate enhancement of either specific or nonspecific immunity.

Summary

The immunomodulatory capacities of N,N-dimethylglycine (dmg) were examined in random-source cats. Blood mononuclear leukocytes of healthy adult cats that had negative results to tests for FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus were exposed in vitro to various concentrations of dmg (10 to 1,000 μg/ml) and were evaluated for proliferative responses to T- or B-cell phytomitogens. Although increased, mean lymphocyte blastogenic responses to phytolectins in dmg-treated cultures did not differ significantly from responses of untreated cultures. For in vivo studies, cats were given a solution containing either 100 mg of dmg or a control solution without dmg orally at 8 am and 6 pm for 40 consecutive days. On posttreatment day 24 and 25, mean blastogenic responses to phytolectins in dmg-treated and control cats inoculated 10 days earlier with an inactivated feline virus vaccine were similar. Cats given dmg and inoculated twice in a 3-week interval with a commercial vaccine containing inactivated feline herpesvirus-1 and feline calicivirus had significantly (P = 0.045) lower virus neutralizing serum antibody titers against feline herpesvirus-1, compared with titers of control cats, whereas feline calicivirus titers were similar in both groups. On day 25, mean serum interferon activity, induced after iv inoculation of Newcastle disease virus, was significantly (P = 0.021) lower in the dmg-treated cats.

Results of this study of dmg in healthy cats failed to demonstrate enhancement of either specific or nonspecific immunity.

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