Culture and initial characterization of the secretory response of neoplastic cat mast cells

F. Charles Mohr From the Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Sheryl K. Dunston From the Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Summary

Mast cells isolated from feline splenic mastocytomas were cultured to study their structural and functional properties. Isolated cells from various cats were grown as monolayer cultures for a mean of 56 days (range, 30 to 76 days). Cat mast cells released allergic mediators in response to compound 48/80, anti-cat serum antibodies, and concanavalin A. On the basis of the finding that secretion from cat mast cells was stimulated by anti-cat serum antibodies and concanavalin A, these cells contain surface-bound immunoglobulins. The presence of mast cell-sensitizing antibodies has been suspected in cats, but never before directly demonstrated. Cultured cat mast cells have cytochemical and functional characteristics common to connective tissue-type mast cells and provide one of the few non-rodent models of cultured cells for the study of this type of mast cell.

Summary

Mast cells isolated from feline splenic mastocytomas were cultured to study their structural and functional properties. Isolated cells from various cats were grown as monolayer cultures for a mean of 56 days (range, 30 to 76 days). Cat mast cells released allergic mediators in response to compound 48/80, anti-cat serum antibodies, and concanavalin A. On the basis of the finding that secretion from cat mast cells was stimulated by anti-cat serum antibodies and concanavalin A, these cells contain surface-bound immunoglobulins. The presence of mast cell-sensitizing antibodies has been suspected in cats, but never before directly demonstrated. Cultured cat mast cells have cytochemical and functional characteristics common to connective tissue-type mast cells and provide one of the few non-rodent models of cultured cells for the study of this type of mast cell.

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