Effects of a thromboxane synthetase inhibitor on established immune complex glomerulonephritis in dogs

Gregory F. Grauer From the Departments of Medical Sciences (Grauer, Frisbie, Longhofer) and Pathobiological Sciences (Cooley), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.

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David D. Frisbie From the Departments of Medical Sciences (Grauer, Frisbie, Longhofer) and Pathobiological Sciences (Cooley), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.

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Susan L. Longhofer From the Departments of Medical Sciences (Grauer, Frisbie, Longhofer) and Pathobiological Sciences (Cooley), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.

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A. James Cooley From the Departments of Medical Sciences (Grauer, Frisbie, Longhofer) and Pathobiological Sciences (Cooley), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.

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Summary

Twelve Beagles were inoculated with concanavalin A, and after a mean ninefold increase in antibody titer, 1 mg of concanavalin A was infused into each renal artery of each dog to induce in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis. Starting 4 weeks after renal arterial infusion, 6 dogs were treated orally 3 times daily with 30 mg of 3-methyl-2 (3 pyridyl)-1-indoleoctanoic acid (CGS 12970)/ kg of body weight, a thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, and 6 dogs (control group) received a gelatin capsule 3 times daily. Endogenous creatinine clearance and 24-hour urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 were determined for each dog prior to renal arterial infusion, at the initiation of treatment and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after initiation of treatment. In addition, methyoxy-3H inulin clearance was determined at initiation of treatment and 4 and 8 weeks later. Renal specimens were examined histologically at the initiation of treatment and 4 and 8 weeks later. Glomerular mononuclear profiles/μm3 were determined from at least 10 equatorially sectioned glomeruli from each dog. Paired t tests were used to compare mean values at the various time points to the respective mean baseline value and 2-sample t tests were used to evaluate differences between treatment groups.

At the start of treatment (4 weeks after renal arterial infusion of concanavalin A), histologic evaluation of renal specimens revealed glomerular epithelial crescent formation, mononuclear cell proliferation, and infiltration of neutrophils. Mononuclear cell profiles and urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 were significantly increased, but endogenous creatinine clearance values were unchanged. Treatment with CGS 12970 did not affect endogenous creatinine clearance, methyoxy-3H inulin clearance, or glomeruli, however, CGS 12970 treatment significantly decreased urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 when compared with values in the control group. These findings suggested that thromboxane has a role in the pathogenesis of established glomerulonephritis and that thromboxane synthetase inhibition treatment may be beneficial in dogs with established glomerulonephritis.

Summary

Twelve Beagles were inoculated with concanavalin A, and after a mean ninefold increase in antibody titer, 1 mg of concanavalin A was infused into each renal artery of each dog to induce in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis. Starting 4 weeks after renal arterial infusion, 6 dogs were treated orally 3 times daily with 30 mg of 3-methyl-2 (3 pyridyl)-1-indoleoctanoic acid (CGS 12970)/ kg of body weight, a thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, and 6 dogs (control group) received a gelatin capsule 3 times daily. Endogenous creatinine clearance and 24-hour urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 were determined for each dog prior to renal arterial infusion, at the initiation of treatment and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after initiation of treatment. In addition, methyoxy-3H inulin clearance was determined at initiation of treatment and 4 and 8 weeks later. Renal specimens were examined histologically at the initiation of treatment and 4 and 8 weeks later. Glomerular mononuclear profiles/μm3 were determined from at least 10 equatorially sectioned glomeruli from each dog. Paired t tests were used to compare mean values at the various time points to the respective mean baseline value and 2-sample t tests were used to evaluate differences between treatment groups.

At the start of treatment (4 weeks after renal arterial infusion of concanavalin A), histologic evaluation of renal specimens revealed glomerular epithelial crescent formation, mononuclear cell proliferation, and infiltration of neutrophils. Mononuclear cell profiles and urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 were significantly increased, but endogenous creatinine clearance values were unchanged. Treatment with CGS 12970 did not affect endogenous creatinine clearance, methyoxy-3H inulin clearance, or glomeruli, however, CGS 12970 treatment significantly decreased urinary excretion of protein and thromboxane B2 when compared with values in the control group. These findings suggested that thromboxane has a role in the pathogenesis of established glomerulonephritis and that thromboxane synthetase inhibition treatment may be beneficial in dogs with established glomerulonephritis.

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