Percutaneous transabdominal hepatic needle biopsies in dogs

Mark E. Hitt From the Departments of Companion Animals (Hitt), Pathology and Microbiology (Hanna), and Anatomy and Physiology (Singh), Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Ave, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, CIA 4P3 Canada.

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 DVM
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Paul Hanna From the Departments of Companion Animals (Hitt), Pathology and Microbiology (Hanna), and Anatomy and Physiology (Singh), Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Ave, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, CIA 4P3 Canada.

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 DVM, MSc
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Amreek Singh From the Departments of Companion Animals (Hitt), Pathology and Microbiology (Hanna), and Anatomy and Physiology (Singh), Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Ave, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, CIA 4P3 Canada.

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 BVSc, PhD

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Summary

Ninety-six (4/dog) percutaneous transabdominal hepatic needle biopsy specimens were obtained from 24 dogs each weighing 10 to 24 kg. Two biopsies were performed in each dog prior to and 5 days after hepatopathy was experimentally induced. Information pertaining to the difficulty encountered in obtaining hepatic tissue is reported for the first of each pair of biopsies. All specimens were of diagnostic quality for light and electron microscopic evaluation. Adverse consequences (morbidity or mortality) resulting from the biopsy technique were not observed by monitoring of vital signs in the immediate postprocedure period and at 4 weeks. Recovery to an ambulatory state was seen in ≤ 30 minutes, except in 1 dog, in which prolonged recovery was attributed to acetylpromazine-induced hypotension.

Summary

Ninety-six (4/dog) percutaneous transabdominal hepatic needle biopsy specimens were obtained from 24 dogs each weighing 10 to 24 kg. Two biopsies were performed in each dog prior to and 5 days after hepatopathy was experimentally induced. Information pertaining to the difficulty encountered in obtaining hepatic tissue is reported for the first of each pair of biopsies. All specimens were of diagnostic quality for light and electron microscopic evaluation. Adverse consequences (morbidity or mortality) resulting from the biopsy technique were not observed by monitoring of vital signs in the immediate postprocedure period and at 4 weeks. Recovery to an ambulatory state was seen in ≤ 30 minutes, except in 1 dog, in which prolonged recovery was attributed to acetylpromazine-induced hypotension.

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