Long-term study of aerobic bacteria of the genital tract in stud dogs

Lena Bjurström From the Departments of Clinical Microbiology (Bjurström) and Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Linde-Forsberg), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.

Search for other papers by Lena Bjurström in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
and
Catharina Linde-Forsberg From the Departments of Clinical Microbiology (Bjurström) and Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Linde-Forsberg), Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.

Search for other papers by Catharina Linde-Forsberg in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

The aerobic bacterial flora of the genital tract was characterized in 15 stud dogs in an 18-month study. The dogs represented 4 breeds and were from 3 kennels. Bacterial samples from the prepuce and semen were collected every month, except in connection with matings, when they were collected weekly (464 samples). The dogs that were included all mated at least once during the study. The mean pregnancy rate, litter size, and pup mortality for the bitches with which they had mated were all within normal limits. The most frequent bacteria isolated from the prepuce and semen were Pasteurella multocida, (β-hemolytic streptococci, and Escherichia coli. There was a tendency for breeds to differ in frequency of the most common bacterial species. Bacterial culture yielded no aerobic growth in 14.2% of the preputial samples and 69.8% of the semen samples. Bacteria were transferred between dog and bitch at mating. In this study of healthy breeding dogs, neither the fertility of the dog nor that of the bitch was affected by the bacteria transferred.

Summary

The aerobic bacterial flora of the genital tract was characterized in 15 stud dogs in an 18-month study. The dogs represented 4 breeds and were from 3 kennels. Bacterial samples from the prepuce and semen were collected every month, except in connection with matings, when they were collected weekly (464 samples). The dogs that were included all mated at least once during the study. The mean pregnancy rate, litter size, and pup mortality for the bitches with which they had mated were all within normal limits. The most frequent bacteria isolated from the prepuce and semen were Pasteurella multocida, (β-hemolytic streptococci, and Escherichia coli. There was a tendency for breeds to differ in frequency of the most common bacterial species. Bacterial culture yielded no aerobic growth in 14.2% of the preputial samples and 69.8% of the semen samples. Bacteria were transferred between dog and bitch at mating. In this study of healthy breeding dogs, neither the fertility of the dog nor that of the bitch was affected by the bacteria transferred.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 39 39 6
PDF Downloads 33 33 1
Advertisement