Development of Anaplasma marginale in male Dermacentor andersoni transferred from parasitemic to susceptible cattle

Katherine M. Kocan From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Katherine M. Kocan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
David Stiller From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by David Stiller in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Will L. Goff From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Will L. Goff in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
P. L. Claypool From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by P. L. Claypool in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Wanda Edwards From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Wanda Edwards in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
S. A. Ewing From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by S. A. Ewing in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Travis C. McGuire From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Travis C. McGuire in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Jakie A. Hair From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Jakie A. Hair in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
Selwyn J. Barron From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Kocan, Edwards), Veterinary Parasitology, Microbiology, and Public Health (Ewing), and Medicine and Surgery (Barron), College of Veterinary Medicine; the Department of Entomology (Hair), and the Department of Statistics (Claypool), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater OK 74078; Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Moscow, ID 83843 (Stiller); and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (McGuire, Goff), College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7030.

Search for other papers by Selwyn J. Barron in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

The development and transmission of Anaplasma marginale was studied in Dermacentor andersoni males. Laboratory-reared male D andersoni were allowed to feed for 7 days on a calf with ascending A marginale parasitemia. The ticks were then held in a humidity chamber for 7 days before being placed on 2 susceptible calves. Anaplasmosis developed in the calves after incubation periods of 24 and 26 days. Gut and salivary glands were collected from ticks on each day of the 23-day experiment and examined with light and electron microscopy. Colonies of A marginale were first observed in midgut epithelial cells on the sixth day of feeding on infected calves, with the highest density of colonies found in gut cells while ticks were between feeding periods. The first colonies contained 1 large dense organism that subsequently gave rise to many reticulated organisms. Initially, these smaller organisms were electron-lucent and then became electron-dense. On the fifth day after ticks were transferred to susceptible calves for feeding, A marginale colonies were found in muscle cells on the hemocoel side of the gut basement membrane. A final site for development of A marginale was the salivary glands. Colonies were first seen in acinar cells on the first day that ticks fed on susceptible calves, with the highest percentage of infected host cells observed on days 7 to 9 of that feeding. Organisms within these colonies were initially electron-lucent, but became electron-dense.

Summary

The development and transmission of Anaplasma marginale was studied in Dermacentor andersoni males. Laboratory-reared male D andersoni were allowed to feed for 7 days on a calf with ascending A marginale parasitemia. The ticks were then held in a humidity chamber for 7 days before being placed on 2 susceptible calves. Anaplasmosis developed in the calves after incubation periods of 24 and 26 days. Gut and salivary glands were collected from ticks on each day of the 23-day experiment and examined with light and electron microscopy. Colonies of A marginale were first observed in midgut epithelial cells on the sixth day of feeding on infected calves, with the highest density of colonies found in gut cells while ticks were between feeding periods. The first colonies contained 1 large dense organism that subsequently gave rise to many reticulated organisms. Initially, these smaller organisms were electron-lucent and then became electron-dense. On the fifth day after ticks were transferred to susceptible calves for feeding, A marginale colonies were found in muscle cells on the hemocoel side of the gut basement membrane. A final site for development of A marginale was the salivary glands. Colonies were first seen in acinar cells on the first day that ticks fed on susceptible calves, with the highest percentage of infected host cells observed on days 7 to 9 of that feeding. Organisms within these colonies were initially electron-lucent, but became electron-dense.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 146 146 31
PDF Downloads 48 48 12
Advertisement