Healing of segmental grafts of digital pad skin in dogs

Steven F. Swaim From the Scott-Ritchey Research Center (Swaim), Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Swaim), Department of Pathobiology (Riddell, Powers); College of Veterinary Medicine Auburn University, AL 36849.

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 DVM, MS
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Kay P. Riddell From the Scott-Ritchey Research Center (Swaim), Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Swaim), Department of Pathobiology (Riddell, Powers); College of Veterinary Medicine Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Robert D. Powers From the Scott-Ritchey Research Center (Swaim), Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Swaim), Department of Pathobiology (Riddell, Powers); College of Veterinary Medicine Auburn University, AL 36849.

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 DVM, PhD

Summary

Pad grafts would be indicated in instances of severe paw trauma when there has been loss of the major weight-bearing pads (ie, metatarsal and metacarpal pads) as well as loss of the digital pads. A practical technique for replacing pad tissue on the remaining paw tissue could avert limb amputation for lack of weight-bearing tissue in the area.

Small segmental digital pad grafts were placed in granulation tissue beds in dogs. Although the grafts were from thick pad skin, they healed well. However, intervening wound areas did not become covered with the heavier keratinized epithelium of the pads. The thinner, more rapidly growing, less keratinized epithelium from the wound edges covered most of the wound.

Summary

Pad grafts would be indicated in instances of severe paw trauma when there has been loss of the major weight-bearing pads (ie, metatarsal and metacarpal pads) as well as loss of the digital pads. A practical technique for replacing pad tissue on the remaining paw tissue could avert limb amputation for lack of weight-bearing tissue in the area.

Small segmental digital pad grafts were placed in granulation tissue beds in dogs. Although the grafts were from thick pad skin, they healed well. However, intervening wound areas did not become covered with the heavier keratinized epithelium of the pads. The thinner, more rapidly growing, less keratinized epithelium from the wound edges covered most of the wound.

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