Aminino acid profiles in dogs with chronic renal failure fed two diets

Bernie Hansen From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Hansen, DiBartola, Chew), of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio (Berrie); and the Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Brownie).

Search for other papers by Bernie Hansen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Stephen P. DiBartola From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Hansen, DiBartola, Chew), of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio (Berrie); and the Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Brownie).

Search for other papers by Stephen P. DiBartola in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Dennis J. Chew From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Hansen, DiBartola, Chew), of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio (Berrie); and the Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Brownie).

Search for other papers by Dennis J. Chew in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Cavell Brownie From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Hansen, DiBartola, Chew), of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio (Berrie); and the Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Brownie).

Search for other papers by Cavell Brownie in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
Helen K. Berrie From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Hansen, DiBartola, Chew), of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati. Ohio (Berrie); and the Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Brownie).

Search for other papers by Helen K. Berrie in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MA

Summary

Amino acid profiles and serum albumin and serum total protein concentrations were evaluated in dogs with renal disease. Nine dogs ranging in age from 1 to 15 years were identified as having mild to moderate chronic renal failure (crf; exogenous creatinine clearance, 0.5 to 2.13 ml/kg of body weight/min). These dogs and a group of 10 clinically normal control dogs, were fed a diet containing 31% protein for 8 weeks, at which time serum and urine imino acid assays and clearance studies were performed. All dogs then were fed a diet containing 16% protein for 3 weeks and then reevaluated.

Chronic renal failure was associated with mild abnormalities in serum concentrations of amino acids. When fed the higher protein diet, dogs with crf had lower serum concentrations of glutamine, leucine, proline, and serine and higher serum concentrations of cystathionine and 3-methylhistidine than clinically normal control dogs. When fed the low protein diet, dogs with crf had lower serum serine concentrations and higher serum concentrations of cystathionine, phenylalanine, and 3-methylhistidine. Urine excretion of amino acids in all dogs on both diets was low, and dogs with crf had lower renal clearances of 3-methylhistidine than control dogs. There were no significant differences in concentrations of serum albumin and total solids between either group, regardless of diet.

We concluded that dogs with mild to moderately severe crf have mild abnormalities of serum free amino acid concentrations, but renal conservation of essential amino acids is not impaired.

Summary

Amino acid profiles and serum albumin and serum total protein concentrations were evaluated in dogs with renal disease. Nine dogs ranging in age from 1 to 15 years were identified as having mild to moderate chronic renal failure (crf; exogenous creatinine clearance, 0.5 to 2.13 ml/kg of body weight/min). These dogs and a group of 10 clinically normal control dogs, were fed a diet containing 31% protein for 8 weeks, at which time serum and urine imino acid assays and clearance studies were performed. All dogs then were fed a diet containing 16% protein for 3 weeks and then reevaluated.

Chronic renal failure was associated with mild abnormalities in serum concentrations of amino acids. When fed the higher protein diet, dogs with crf had lower serum concentrations of glutamine, leucine, proline, and serine and higher serum concentrations of cystathionine and 3-methylhistidine than clinically normal control dogs. When fed the low protein diet, dogs with crf had lower serum serine concentrations and higher serum concentrations of cystathionine, phenylalanine, and 3-methylhistidine. Urine excretion of amino acids in all dogs on both diets was low, and dogs with crf had lower renal clearances of 3-methylhistidine than control dogs. There were no significant differences in concentrations of serum albumin and total solids between either group, regardless of diet.

We concluded that dogs with mild to moderately severe crf have mild abnormalities of serum free amino acid concentrations, but renal conservation of essential amino acids is not impaired.

Advertisement