Myocardial taurine concentrations in cats with cardiac disease and in healthy cats fed taurine-modified diets

Philip R. Fox From the Department of Medicine, the Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10021, and the Department of Developmental Biochemistry, the Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY 10314.

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 DVM, MS
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John A. Sturman From the Department of Medicine, the Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10021, and the Department of Developmental Biochemistry, the Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY 10314.

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Summary

Myocardial taurine concentrations were measured in cats with cardiac disease and in healthy cats fed diets with various concentrations of taurine. Group 1 was composed of 26 cats with 3 categories of naturally developing cardiac disease: dilatative cardiomyopathy (group 1A), 10 cats; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (group 1B), 9 cats; and volume overload (group 1C), 7 cats. These cats had been fed various commercial diets. Group 2 was composed of 40 healthy cats that had been fed diets varying in taurine concentration (0 to 1% taurine) for at least 2 years.

Mean myocardial taurine concentrations did not differ significantly between group-1 cats with dilatative cardiomyopathy and those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or volume overload. Cats in group 1A had a mean myocardial taurine concentration 3 times higher than healthy cats fed a taurine-free diet (P< 0.002). Mean myocardial taurine concentrations did not differ significantly between group-1A cats and healthy cats fed a diet containing 0.02% taurine; group-1A cats had significantly lower mean myocardial taurine concentrations than did healthy cats fed a synthetic diet containing 0.05 or 1.0% taurine (P < 0.001). Acute oral administration of taurine in 5 group-1A cats appeared to increase mean myocardial taurine concentrations, compared with similar cats not given taurine during treatment for cardiac failure. In group-2 cats, mean myocardial taurine concentrations increased directly with percentage of dietary taurine.

Summary

Myocardial taurine concentrations were measured in cats with cardiac disease and in healthy cats fed diets with various concentrations of taurine. Group 1 was composed of 26 cats with 3 categories of naturally developing cardiac disease: dilatative cardiomyopathy (group 1A), 10 cats; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (group 1B), 9 cats; and volume overload (group 1C), 7 cats. These cats had been fed various commercial diets. Group 2 was composed of 40 healthy cats that had been fed diets varying in taurine concentration (0 to 1% taurine) for at least 2 years.

Mean myocardial taurine concentrations did not differ significantly between group-1 cats with dilatative cardiomyopathy and those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or volume overload. Cats in group 1A had a mean myocardial taurine concentration 3 times higher than healthy cats fed a taurine-free diet (P< 0.002). Mean myocardial taurine concentrations did not differ significantly between group-1A cats and healthy cats fed a diet containing 0.02% taurine; group-1A cats had significantly lower mean myocardial taurine concentrations than did healthy cats fed a synthetic diet containing 0.05 or 1.0% taurine (P < 0.001). Acute oral administration of taurine in 5 group-1A cats appeared to increase mean myocardial taurine concentrations, compared with similar cats not given taurine during treatment for cardiac failure. In group-2 cats, mean myocardial taurine concentrations increased directly with percentage of dietary taurine.

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