Evaluation of peritoneal fluid following intestinal resection and anastomosis in horses

R. Reid Hanson From the Departments of Surgical Sciencs (Hanson, Nixon), Medical Sciences (Gronwall, Meyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Biostatistics Division, Department of Statistics (Pendergast), College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Alan J. Nixon From the Departments of Surgical Sciencs (Hanson, Nixon), Medical Sciences (Gronwall, Meyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Biostatistics Division, Department of Statistics (Pendergast), College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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R. Gronwall From the Departments of Surgical Sciencs (Hanson, Nixon), Medical Sciences (Gronwall, Meyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Biostatistics Division, Department of Statistics (Pendergast), College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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D. Meyer From the Departments of Surgical Sciencs (Hanson, Nixon), Medical Sciences (Gronwall, Meyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Biostatistics Division, Department of Statistics (Pendergast), College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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J. Pendergast From the Departments of Surgical Sciencs (Hanson, Nixon), Medical Sciences (Gronwall, Meyer), College of Veterinary Medicine, and Biostatistics Division, Department of Statistics (Pendergast), College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Summary

Postoperative abdominal fluid changes were compared in 2 groups of horses; those undergoing double small-colon resection and anastomosis (n = 10) and those undergoing exploratory celiotomy alone (n = 5). Peritoneal fluid was collected before surgery and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Total and differential nucleated cell counts, rbc numbers, and total protein and fibrinogen concentrations were evaluated. In both groups, all values were significantly higher than normal on the first postoperative day (after small-colon resection and anastomoses, wbc = 130,350 ± 23,310 cells/µl, rbc = 7,389,000 ± 6,234,000 cells/µl, total protein = 3.63 ± 0.16 g/dl; after exploratory celiotomy alone, wbc = 166,620 ± 34,340 cells/µl, rbc = 295,000 ± 86,070 cells/µl, total protein 4.38 ± 0.54 g/dl). The number of total peritoneal nucleated cells and rbc significantly decreased after the first postoperative day, whereas total protein and fibrinogen concentrations, percent neutrophils, and percent mononuclear cells remained unchanged. None of the values had returned to normal by postoperative day 7 (after small-colon resection and anastomoses, wbc = 45,600 ± 8,765 cells/µl, rbc= 95,390 ± 53,380 cells/µl, total protein = 4.39 ± 0.23 g/dl; after exploratory celiotomy alone, wbc= 43,340 ± 7,746 cells/µl, rbc = 12,860 ± 11,790 cells/µl, total protein = 3.92 ± 2.20 g/dl.) The resection and anastomosis group had a significantly lower total protein concentration on the first postoperative day and a significantly higher mean total rbc count over the entire 7-day postoperative evaluation than did horses that underwent celiotomy alone. Other values in the 2 groups of horses did not differ significantly. As a result, there was insufficient evidence to conclude that resection and anastomosis of the small colon in healthy horses causes a different inflammatory response than does manipulation of the intestine alone.

Summary

Postoperative abdominal fluid changes were compared in 2 groups of horses; those undergoing double small-colon resection and anastomosis (n = 10) and those undergoing exploratory celiotomy alone (n = 5). Peritoneal fluid was collected before surgery and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Total and differential nucleated cell counts, rbc numbers, and total protein and fibrinogen concentrations were evaluated. In both groups, all values were significantly higher than normal on the first postoperative day (after small-colon resection and anastomoses, wbc = 130,350 ± 23,310 cells/µl, rbc = 7,389,000 ± 6,234,000 cells/µl, total protein = 3.63 ± 0.16 g/dl; after exploratory celiotomy alone, wbc = 166,620 ± 34,340 cells/µl, rbc = 295,000 ± 86,070 cells/µl, total protein 4.38 ± 0.54 g/dl). The number of total peritoneal nucleated cells and rbc significantly decreased after the first postoperative day, whereas total protein and fibrinogen concentrations, percent neutrophils, and percent mononuclear cells remained unchanged. None of the values had returned to normal by postoperative day 7 (after small-colon resection and anastomoses, wbc = 45,600 ± 8,765 cells/µl, rbc= 95,390 ± 53,380 cells/µl, total protein = 4.39 ± 0.23 g/dl; after exploratory celiotomy alone, wbc= 43,340 ± 7,746 cells/µl, rbc = 12,860 ± 11,790 cells/µl, total protein = 3.92 ± 2.20 g/dl.) The resection and anastomosis group had a significantly lower total protein concentration on the first postoperative day and a significantly higher mean total rbc count over the entire 7-day postoperative evaluation than did horses that underwent celiotomy alone. Other values in the 2 groups of horses did not differ significantly. As a result, there was insufficient evidence to conclude that resection and anastomosis of the small colon in healthy horses causes a different inflammatory response than does manipulation of the intestine alone.

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