Adhesion of bacteria to the cecal mucosal surface of conventional and germ-free chickens infected with Eimeria tenella

Eiichiroh Baba From the Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan.

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Hajime Wakeshima From the Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan.

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Kazunori Fukui From the Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan.

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Tsuneo Fukata From the Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan.

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Akira Arakawa From the Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture, University of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka 591, Japan.

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Summary

When Salmonella typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens were tested in conventional chickens, larger numbers of Styphimurium and C perfringens adhered to Eimeriatenella-infected ceca than to uninfected ceca. In germ-free chickens, Styphimurium and C perfringens adhered to the E tenella-infected cecal mucosa more than to the uninfected cecal mucosa, but fewer Bacteroides vulgatus and Bifidobacterium thermophilum adhered to the E tenella-infected ceca than to the uninfected ceca. Many bacteria adhered to the lesions caused by E tenella as observed by scanning electron microscopy. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that infection with E tenella upsets the balance of competitive adherence of bacteria, allowing more colonization of Styphimurium and C perfringens.

Summary

When Salmonella typhimurium and Clostridium perfringens were tested in conventional chickens, larger numbers of Styphimurium and C perfringens adhered to Eimeriatenella-infected ceca than to uninfected ceca. In germ-free chickens, Styphimurium and C perfringens adhered to the E tenella-infected cecal mucosa more than to the uninfected cecal mucosa, but fewer Bacteroides vulgatus and Bifidobacterium thermophilum adhered to the E tenella-infected ceca than to the uninfected ceca. Many bacteria adhered to the lesions caused by E tenella as observed by scanning electron microscopy. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that infection with E tenella upsets the balance of competitive adherence of bacteria, allowing more colonization of Styphimurium and C perfringens.

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