Effects of a fixed compression load on the osteogenic effect of autogenous cancellous bone grafts in dogs

Steven A. Martinez From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (martinez, Probst, Hauptman), Veterinary Medical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 and the Department of Pathobiology (Weisbrode), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Curtis W. Probst From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (martinez, Probst, Hauptman), Veterinary Medical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 and the Department of Pathobiology (Weisbrode), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Joseph G. Hauptman From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (martinez, Probst, Hauptman), Veterinary Medical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 and the Department of Pathobiology (Weisbrode), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Steven E. Weisbrode From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (martinez, Probst, Hauptman), Veterinary Medical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 and the Department of Pathobiology (Weisbrode), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Summary

A standardized cortical defect was created on the caudal cortex of the proximal portion of each ulna in 5 adult mixed-breed dogs. One gram of autogenous cancellous bone graft (acbg) was obtained from the greater tubercle of the ipsilateral humerus. The cortical defect in the ulna of 1 limb was filled with 1 g of acbg that had been compressed with 2-MPa pressure for 30 seconds. One gram of noncompressed acbg was placed into the contralateral ulnar cortical defect. The compressed and noncompressed acbg recipient sites were radiographed at weekly intervals. Dogs were euthanatized 8 weeks after surgery, and the acbg recipient sites were harvested for histomor-phometric analysis. Optical densitometry was performed on all radiographs. There was no significant difference between compressed and noncompressed acbg with optical densitometry or histomorphometric analysis for total bone area. We concluded that there was no difference in osteogenic capability between compressed and noncompressed acbg of equal mass.

Summary

A standardized cortical defect was created on the caudal cortex of the proximal portion of each ulna in 5 adult mixed-breed dogs. One gram of autogenous cancellous bone graft (acbg) was obtained from the greater tubercle of the ipsilateral humerus. The cortical defect in the ulna of 1 limb was filled with 1 g of acbg that had been compressed with 2-MPa pressure for 30 seconds. One gram of noncompressed acbg was placed into the contralateral ulnar cortical defect. The compressed and noncompressed acbg recipient sites were radiographed at weekly intervals. Dogs were euthanatized 8 weeks after surgery, and the acbg recipient sites were harvested for histomor-phometric analysis. Optical densitometry was performed on all radiographs. There was no significant difference between compressed and noncompressed acbg with optical densitometry or histomorphometric analysis for total bone area. We concluded that there was no difference in osteogenic capability between compressed and noncompressed acbg of equal mass.

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