Effects of chlorothiazide on urinary excretion of calcium in clinically normal dogs

Jody P. Lulich From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Carl A. Osborne From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Summary

Administration of thiazide diuretics has been recommended to prevent calcium oxalate urolith development in dogs. To evaluate the effects of thiazide diuretics in dogs, 24-hour urine excretion of calcium was measured in 6 clinically normal Beagles after administration of chlorothiazide (ctz) for 2 weeks, administration of ctz for 10 weeks, and administration of calcium carbonate and ctz for 2 weeks. Compared with baseline values, 24-hour urine calcium excretion did not decrease after ctz administration. When ctz was given at a high dosage (130 mg/ kg of body weight), urinary calcium excretion was significantly (P < 0.04) higher than baseline values. Based on these observations, we do not recommend ctz for treatment or prevention of canine calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

Summary

Administration of thiazide diuretics has been recommended to prevent calcium oxalate urolith development in dogs. To evaluate the effects of thiazide diuretics in dogs, 24-hour urine excretion of calcium was measured in 6 clinically normal Beagles after administration of chlorothiazide (ctz) for 2 weeks, administration of ctz for 10 weeks, and administration of calcium carbonate and ctz for 2 weeks. Compared with baseline values, 24-hour urine calcium excretion did not decrease after ctz administration. When ctz was given at a high dosage (130 mg/ kg of body weight), urinary calcium excretion was significantly (P < 0.04) higher than baseline values. Based on these observations, we do not recommend ctz for treatment or prevention of canine calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

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