Cardiovascular and respiratory effects of propofol administration in hypovolemic dogs

Jan E. Ilkiw From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 BVSc, PhD
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Peter J. Pascoe From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Steve C. Haskins From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 DVM, MS
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John D. Patz From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 BA

Summary

Cardiopulmonary effects of propofol were studied in hypovolemic dogs from completion of, until 1 hour after administration. Hypovolemia was induced by withdrawal of blood from dogs until mean arterial pressure of 60 mm of Hg was achieved. After stabilization at this pressure for 1 hour, 6 mg of propofol/kg of body weight was administered iv to 7 dogs, and cardiopulmonary effects were measured. After blood withdrawal and prior to propofol administration, oxygen utilization ratio increased, whereas mean arterial pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac index, oxygen delivery, mixed venous oxygen tension, and mixed venous oxygen content decreased from baseline. Three minutes after propofol administration, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, oxygen utilization ratio, venous admixture, and arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tensions increased, whereas mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, mixed venous oxygen content, arterial and mixed venous pH decreased from values measured prior to propofol administration. Fifteen minutes after propofol administration, mixed venous carbon dioxide tension was still increased; however by 30 minutes after propofol administration, all measurements had returned to values similar to those measured prior to propofol administration.

Summary

Cardiopulmonary effects of propofol were studied in hypovolemic dogs from completion of, until 1 hour after administration. Hypovolemia was induced by withdrawal of blood from dogs until mean arterial pressure of 60 mm of Hg was achieved. After stabilization at this pressure for 1 hour, 6 mg of propofol/kg of body weight was administered iv to 7 dogs, and cardiopulmonary effects were measured. After blood withdrawal and prior to propofol administration, oxygen utilization ratio increased, whereas mean arterial pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac index, oxygen delivery, mixed venous oxygen tension, and mixed venous oxygen content decreased from baseline. Three minutes after propofol administration, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, oxygen utilization ratio, venous admixture, and arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tensions increased, whereas mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen tension, mixed venous oxygen content, arterial and mixed venous pH decreased from values measured prior to propofol administration. Fifteen minutes after propofol administration, mixed venous carbon dioxide tension was still increased; however by 30 minutes after propofol administration, all measurements had returned to values similar to those measured prior to propofol administration.

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