Induction of fatty liver in cows by ethionine administration and concomitant decreases of serum apolipoproteins B-100 and A-I concentrations

Eiji Uchida From the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University (Uchida, Takahashi), Ebetsu 069, and Hokkaido Branch Laboratory, National Institute of Animal Health (Katoh), Hitsujigaoka 4, Sapporo 062, Japan.

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Norio Katoh From the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University (Uchida, Takahashi), Ebetsu 069, and Hokkaido Branch Laboratory, National Institute of Animal Health (Katoh), Hitsujigaoka 4, Sapporo 062, Japan.

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Kiyoshi Takahashi From the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University (Uchida, Takahashi), Ebetsu 069, and Hokkaido Branch Laboratory, National Institute of Animal Health (Katoh), Hitsujigaoka 4, Sapporo 062, Japan.

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Summary

Ethionine, an analogue of methionine, induces fatty liver in rats by inhibiting protein synthesis, including that of apolipoproteins in liver. Ethionine was administered to cows to elucidate the participation in fatty liver development of impaired triglyceride secretion from liver attributable to decreased apolipoprotein synthesis. The administration resulted in a significant increase of liver triglyceride contents. Several apolipoproteins were found to have decreased concentrations. In particular, apolipoprotein B-100 in very low-density (0.95 to 1.006 g/ml) lipoprotein and in low-density (1.006 to 1.063 g/ml) lipoprotein fractions was greatly reduced. The decreases of apolipoprotein B-100 concentrations in the 2 lipoprotein fractions were at least partly correlated to the decreased triglyceride concentrations in the respective fractions. Decreased concentrations of apolipoprotein A-I in high-density (1.063 to 1.210 g/ml) lipoprotein were also observed, although not as distinctly as with apolipoprotein B-100. Total cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations in low- and high-density lipoprotein fractions were decreased. The decrease in cholesterol was attributed to reduced concentrations of cholesteryl esters. It was suggested that the impaired lipid secretion from liver attributable to the decreased apolipoprotein concentrations has a role in ethionine-induced fatty liver of cows.

Summary

Ethionine, an analogue of methionine, induces fatty liver in rats by inhibiting protein synthesis, including that of apolipoproteins in liver. Ethionine was administered to cows to elucidate the participation in fatty liver development of impaired triglyceride secretion from liver attributable to decreased apolipoprotein synthesis. The administration resulted in a significant increase of liver triglyceride contents. Several apolipoproteins were found to have decreased concentrations. In particular, apolipoprotein B-100 in very low-density (0.95 to 1.006 g/ml) lipoprotein and in low-density (1.006 to 1.063 g/ml) lipoprotein fractions was greatly reduced. The decreases of apolipoprotein B-100 concentrations in the 2 lipoprotein fractions were at least partly correlated to the decreased triglyceride concentrations in the respective fractions. Decreased concentrations of apolipoprotein A-I in high-density (1.063 to 1.210 g/ml) lipoprotein were also observed, although not as distinctly as with apolipoprotein B-100. Total cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations in low- and high-density lipoprotein fractions were decreased. The decrease in cholesterol was attributed to reduced concentrations of cholesteryl esters. It was suggested that the impaired lipid secretion from liver attributable to the decreased apolipoprotein concentrations has a role in ethionine-induced fatty liver of cows.

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