Immunotoxicity of ochratoxin A to growing gilts

Roger B. Harvey From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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Marcel H. Elissalde From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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Leon F. Kubena From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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Elizabeth A. Weaver From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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Donald E. Carrier From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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Beverly A. Clement From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, College Station, TX 77845 (Harvey, Elissalde, Kubena, Weaver, Corrier), and the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843 (Clement).

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SUMMARY

Ochratoxin A (oa) was incorporated in the diets of growing gilts (mean body weight, 20.1 kg) at a concentration of 2.5 mg of oa/kg of feed and was fed continuously for 35 days. Humoral and cell-mediated immunologic measurements were evaluated to determine the effects of oa on immune function in swine. Cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity to phytohemagglutinin (pha), delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin, pha-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis, interleukin-2 production, total and isotype immunoglobulin concentrations, antibody response to chicken rbc, and macrophage activation were used to evaluate immune function. Gilts treated with oa had reduced cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to pha, reduced delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin, decreased stimulation index for lymphoblastogenesis, decreased interleukin-2 production when lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, and decreased number and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Differences were not observed for total and isotype immunoglobulin concentrations, or humoral hemagglutination (chicken rbc) titer. These data indicate that oa may suppress cell-mediated immune response in growing swine.

SUMMARY

Ochratoxin A (oa) was incorporated in the diets of growing gilts (mean body weight, 20.1 kg) at a concentration of 2.5 mg of oa/kg of feed and was fed continuously for 35 days. Humoral and cell-mediated immunologic measurements were evaluated to determine the effects of oa on immune function in swine. Cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity to phytohemagglutinin (pha), delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin, pha-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis, interleukin-2 production, total and isotype immunoglobulin concentrations, antibody response to chicken rbc, and macrophage activation were used to evaluate immune function. Gilts treated with oa had reduced cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to pha, reduced delayed hypersensitivity to tuberculin, decreased stimulation index for lymphoblastogenesis, decreased interleukin-2 production when lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, and decreased number and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Differences were not observed for total and isotype immunoglobulin concentrations, or humoral hemagglutination (chicken rbc) titer. These data indicate that oa may suppress cell-mediated immune response in growing swine.

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