Detection of Campylobacter upsaliensis in diarrheic dogs and cats, using a selective medium with cefoperazone

André P. Burnens From the Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, University of Berne, Länggass-Strasse 122, CH-3012 Berne, Switzerland.

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Jacques Nicolet From the Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, University of Berne, Länggass-Strasse 122, CH-3012 Berne, Switzerland.

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Summary

Using a newly formulated selective medium containing cefoperazone, we isolated 72 Campylobacter strains in fecal samples from 397 diarrheic dogs and cats. Of these, 39 were thermophilic catalase-negative Campylobacter species. We identified these Campylobacter strains by dna:dna hybridization, using digoxigenin-labeled total genomic dna of 4 Campylobacter reference strains (C jejuni, C coli, C lari, and C upsaliensis) as a probe. The labeling was done with a commercially available kit. We could identify 66 of the 72 Campylobacter isolates to the species level with this method; identification with probes always agreed with conventional test results. Of the 66 identified strains, 33 were C upsaliensis and 33 were C jejuni. Six isolates could not be assigned to a known species with probes or conventional tests. On the basis of our findings, C upsaliensis is more resistant to cefoperazone than to cephalothin, thereby explaining the unexpected recovery of these Campylobacters on cephalosporin-containing media.

Summary

Using a newly formulated selective medium containing cefoperazone, we isolated 72 Campylobacter strains in fecal samples from 397 diarrheic dogs and cats. Of these, 39 were thermophilic catalase-negative Campylobacter species. We identified these Campylobacter strains by dna:dna hybridization, using digoxigenin-labeled total genomic dna of 4 Campylobacter reference strains (C jejuni, C coli, C lari, and C upsaliensis) as a probe. The labeling was done with a commercially available kit. We could identify 66 of the 72 Campylobacter isolates to the species level with this method; identification with probes always agreed with conventional test results. Of the 66 identified strains, 33 were C upsaliensis and 33 were C jejuni. Six isolates could not be assigned to a known species with probes or conventional tests. On the basis of our findings, C upsaliensis is more resistant to cefoperazone than to cephalothin, thereby explaining the unexpected recovery of these Campylobacters on cephalosporin-containing media.

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