Effects of phosphorus/calcium-restricted and phosphorus/calcium-replete 32% protein diets in dogs with chronic renal failure

Delmar R. Finco From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Delmar R. Finco in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Scott A. Brown From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Scott A. Brown in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, PhD
,
Wayne A. Crowell From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Wayne A. Crowell in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Carlotta A. Groves From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Carlotta A. Groves in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
J. Robert Duncan From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by J. Robert Duncan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Jeanne A. Barsanti From the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology (Finco, Brown, Groves, Barsanti) and Veterinary Pathology (Crowell, Duncan), College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Search for other papers by Jeanne A. Barsanti in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Twenty-four dogs with induced, severe chronic renal failure were allotted to 2 groups of 12 each. Group-A dogs were fed a 0.4% phosphorus (P)/0.6% calcium, 32% protein diet, and group-B dogs were fed a 1.4% P/l.9% calcium, 32% protein diet. Dogs were studied over 24 months to determine clinical status, survival, blood biochemical alterations, glomerular filtration rate (gfr), urinary excretion of P and protein, renal morphologic changes, and renal tissue concentrations of calcium, P, and magnesium.

Group-A dogs developed statistically significant differences from group-B dogs in several blood biochemical values (pcv and total solids, calcium, P, potassium, sodium, chlonde, total CO2 (TCO2), anion gap, and parathyroid hormone concentrations) and in urinary P excretion.

Mean ( ± sem) gfr values in group-A and group-B dogs were nearly identical when diets were initiated (group _A = 0.73 ± 0.05 ml/min/kg of body weight; group B = 0.72 ± 0.08 ml/min/kg), but significantly (P = 0.0346) lower gfr developed in group-B than in group-A dogs over time. At 24 months, gfr in survivors was 0.83 ± 0.08 and 0.63 ± 0.15 ml/min/kg for dogs of groups A and B, respectively.

Other measurements favored the hypothesis that P/calcium restriction was beneficial, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Survival was greater at 24 months in group-A than in group-B (7 vs 5) dogs, and renal tissue concentrations of calcium and P were higher in group-B than in group-A dogs.

Differences were not detected between groups in urinary excretion of protein and in the type or severity of renal lesions.

We conclude that P/calcium restriction at 32% protein intake is beneficial to dogs with chronic renal failure, but that the degree of restriction imposed in group-A dogs of this study did not prevent development of abnormalities. Factors other than dietary P/calcium intake may have a role in progression of renal failure to uremia.

Summary

Twenty-four dogs with induced, severe chronic renal failure were allotted to 2 groups of 12 each. Group-A dogs were fed a 0.4% phosphorus (P)/0.6% calcium, 32% protein diet, and group-B dogs were fed a 1.4% P/l.9% calcium, 32% protein diet. Dogs were studied over 24 months to determine clinical status, survival, blood biochemical alterations, glomerular filtration rate (gfr), urinary excretion of P and protein, renal morphologic changes, and renal tissue concentrations of calcium, P, and magnesium.

Group-A dogs developed statistically significant differences from group-B dogs in several blood biochemical values (pcv and total solids, calcium, P, potassium, sodium, chlonde, total CO2 (TCO2), anion gap, and parathyroid hormone concentrations) and in urinary P excretion.

Mean ( ± sem) gfr values in group-A and group-B dogs were nearly identical when diets were initiated (group _A = 0.73 ± 0.05 ml/min/kg of body weight; group B = 0.72 ± 0.08 ml/min/kg), but significantly (P = 0.0346) lower gfr developed in group-B than in group-A dogs over time. At 24 months, gfr in survivors was 0.83 ± 0.08 and 0.63 ± 0.15 ml/min/kg for dogs of groups A and B, respectively.

Other measurements favored the hypothesis that P/calcium restriction was beneficial, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Survival was greater at 24 months in group-A than in group-B (7 vs 5) dogs, and renal tissue concentrations of calcium and P were higher in group-B than in group-A dogs.

Differences were not detected between groups in urinary excretion of protein and in the type or severity of renal lesions.

We conclude that P/calcium restriction at 32% protein intake is beneficial to dogs with chronic renal failure, but that the degree of restriction imposed in group-A dogs of this study did not prevent development of abnormalities. Factors other than dietary P/calcium intake may have a role in progression of renal failure to uremia.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 54 54 8
PDF Downloads 36 36 5
Advertisement