Splenectomy in cattle via transthoracic approach

J. R. Thompson From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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K. W. Kersting From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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W. M. Wass From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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I. A. Davis From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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K. H. Plumlee From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

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Summary

Sixty-eight cattle under general anesthesia were splenectomized. The transthoracic approach was used to provide better access to the spleen and to facilitate ligature of the major splenic vessels. The procedure was easier and less time-consuming, compared with other surgical approaches, and is considered to be less stressful to the animals. Postoperative recovery was complete in 67 of 68 cattle. After surgery, 1 animal developed respiratory tract disease that was thought to have been unrelated to the surgery.

Summary

Sixty-eight cattle under general anesthesia were splenectomized. The transthoracic approach was used to provide better access to the spleen and to facilitate ligature of the major splenic vessels. The procedure was easier and less time-consuming, compared with other surgical approaches, and is considered to be less stressful to the animals. Postoperative recovery was complete in 67 of 68 cattle. After surgery, 1 animal developed respiratory tract disease that was thought to have been unrelated to the surgery.

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