Effects of an extract of Gingko biloba on bromethalin-induced cerebral lipid peroxidation and edema in rats

David C. Dorman From the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Dorman, Buck), and Consul-Tox Inc, Tolono, IL 61880 (Côté).

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Louise Marie Côté From the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Dorman, Buck), and Consul-Tox Inc, Tolono, IL 61880 (Côté).

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William B. Buck From the Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Dorman, Buck), and Consul-Tox Inc, Tolono, IL 61880 (Côté).

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Summary

The effects of administration of a commercially available extract of Gingko biloba (egb) on bromethalin-induced brain lipid peroxidation and cerebral edema in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined. Gingko biloba extract was given (100 mg/kg) by gavage immediately after bromethalin (1.0 mg/kg) administration. Rats were euthanatized at 24 hours after dosing. Brain lipid peroxidation was determined by measurement of brain malonaldehyde-thiobarbituric acid chromophore (mda-tba) concentration, brain sodium concentration, and brain water content.

Treatment of bromethalin-dosed rats (10/group) with egb was associated with a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in clinical sign severity, compared with bromethalin-dosed saline solution-treated rats. All rats given bromethalin and saline solution developed clinical signs of toxicosis including CNS depression, hind limb weakness, ataxia, paralysis, and coma. Some rats given bromethalin and egb developed clinical signs, however, none developed hind limb paralysis. The brain mda-tba concentration (2.4 ± 0.5 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein), percentage of water in brain tissue (80.3 ± 0.30%), and brain sodium concentration (6.68 ± 0.21 mg/g of dry weight) were significantly increased in rats given bromethalin and saline solution, compared with control rats given saline solution (1.0 ± 0.1 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein; 78.1 ± 0.33% water in brain tissue; 4.83 ± 0.30 mg of brain Na+/g of dry weight) and rats given bromethalin and egb (1.6 ± 0.2 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein; 79.3 ± 0.31% water in brain tissue; 5.37 ± 0.34 mg of brain Na+/g of dry weight). The mda-tba concentration (1.2 ± 0.2 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein), percentage of water in brain tissue (78.7 ± 0.40%), and brain sodium concentration (4.93 ± 0.26 mg/g of dry weight) increased slightly in control rats given egb.

Summary

The effects of administration of a commercially available extract of Gingko biloba (egb) on bromethalin-induced brain lipid peroxidation and cerebral edema in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined. Gingko biloba extract was given (100 mg/kg) by gavage immediately after bromethalin (1.0 mg/kg) administration. Rats were euthanatized at 24 hours after dosing. Brain lipid peroxidation was determined by measurement of brain malonaldehyde-thiobarbituric acid chromophore (mda-tba) concentration, brain sodium concentration, and brain water content.

Treatment of bromethalin-dosed rats (10/group) with egb was associated with a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in clinical sign severity, compared with bromethalin-dosed saline solution-treated rats. All rats given bromethalin and saline solution developed clinical signs of toxicosis including CNS depression, hind limb weakness, ataxia, paralysis, and coma. Some rats given bromethalin and egb developed clinical signs, however, none developed hind limb paralysis. The brain mda-tba concentration (2.4 ± 0.5 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein), percentage of water in brain tissue (80.3 ± 0.30%), and brain sodium concentration (6.68 ± 0.21 mg/g of dry weight) were significantly increased in rats given bromethalin and saline solution, compared with control rats given saline solution (1.0 ± 0.1 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein; 78.1 ± 0.33% water in brain tissue; 4.83 ± 0.30 mg of brain Na+/g of dry weight) and rats given bromethalin and egb (1.6 ± 0.2 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein; 79.3 ± 0.31% water in brain tissue; 5.37 ± 0.34 mg of brain Na+/g of dry weight). The mda-tba concentration (1.2 ± 0.2 Δ mda-tba concentration/mg of protein), percentage of water in brain tissue (78.7 ± 0.40%), and brain sodium concentration (4.93 ± 0.26 mg/g of dry weight) increased slightly in control rats given egb.

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