Clinical and pathologic effects of oral administration of transmissible gastroenteritis vaccine to gnotobiotic pigs

G. L. Waxier From the Department of Pathology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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 DVM, PhD

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Summary

Pigs from 3 fitters kept under gnotobiotic conditions were inoculated orally with virulent transmissible gastroenteritis (tge) virus, a tge vaccine, or Hank’s balanced salt solution at 2 days of age and then euthanatized at intervals ranging from 1 to 7 days after inoculation. Pigs exposed to the vaccine had clinical evidence of diarrhea and weakness. Lesions resembling those of tge were revealed grossly, microscopically, and by scanning electron microscopy. Viral antigen was seen in intestinal epithelial cells by the direct fluorescent antibody technique. The disease induced by the vaccine virus had a longer incubation period and lesions were less severe than that induced by the virulent virus.

Summary

Pigs from 3 fitters kept under gnotobiotic conditions were inoculated orally with virulent transmissible gastroenteritis (tge) virus, a tge vaccine, or Hank’s balanced salt solution at 2 days of age and then euthanatized at intervals ranging from 1 to 7 days after inoculation. Pigs exposed to the vaccine had clinical evidence of diarrhea and weakness. Lesions resembling those of tge were revealed grossly, microscopically, and by scanning electron microscopy. Viral antigen was seen in intestinal epithelial cells by the direct fluorescent antibody technique. The disease induced by the vaccine virus had a longer incubation period and lesions were less severe than that induced by the virulent virus.

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