Celiac trunk cannulation for obtaining abomasal lymph from cattle

David G. Baker From the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Baker, Gershwin), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (Snider).

Search for other papers by David G. Baker in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Laurel J. Gershwin From the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Baker, Gershwin), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (Snider).

Search for other papers by Laurel J. Gershwin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Theron G. Snider III From the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Baker, Gershwin), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (Snider).

Search for other papers by Theron G. Snider III in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Cannulation of the celiac trunk was surgically performed in 26 Holstein steers. The procedure was successful in 23 (88.5%) of the steers. Twenty-two of the steers were infected either naturally or experimentally with the abomasal nematode, Ostertagia ostertagi and/or other gastrointestinal parasites. The remaining 4 steers were not infected. Lymph obtained after surgery was used in various immunologic and biochemical assays. Daily lymph flow rate and total and differential wbc counts were determined after surgeiy in 4 of the infected and 3 of the noninfected steers. Steers were euthanatized for tissue specimen collection 7 days after surgery. At the time of euthanasia, lymph was still flowing from the cannula of 13 (56.5%) of the steers in which surgeiy was successful. This surgical procedure represents a valuable technique for studying at the local level, immunologic and physiologic responses of cattle to infection with O ostertagi.

Summary

Cannulation of the celiac trunk was surgically performed in 26 Holstein steers. The procedure was successful in 23 (88.5%) of the steers. Twenty-two of the steers were infected either naturally or experimentally with the abomasal nematode, Ostertagia ostertagi and/or other gastrointestinal parasites. The remaining 4 steers were not infected. Lymph obtained after surgery was used in various immunologic and biochemical assays. Daily lymph flow rate and total and differential wbc counts were determined after surgeiy in 4 of the infected and 3 of the noninfected steers. Steers were euthanatized for tissue specimen collection 7 days after surgery. At the time of euthanasia, lymph was still flowing from the cannula of 13 (56.5%) of the steers in which surgeiy was successful. This surgical procedure represents a valuable technique for studying at the local level, immunologic and physiologic responses of cattle to infection with O ostertagi.

Advertisement