Use of a multivariable indexing score for hygiene variables in relation to egg production

Hussni O. Mohammed From the Section of Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Science, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (Mohammed) and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Carpenter).

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 BVSc, MVSc, PhD
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Tim E. Carpenter From the Section of Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Science, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (Mohammed) and Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Carpenter).

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SUMMARY

An indexing system for hygiene variables associated with egg production was developed by use of data collected from chicken flocks in southern California. The data were analyzed by factor and regression analysis.

On the basis of our findings, hygiene index in relation to egg production consists of ventilation system, cooling system, manure removal, and truck movement. Flocks kept under natural ventilation produced, on the average, 2% more hen-day eggs than flocks kept under artificial ventilation. Flocks placed in houses with roof sprinklers produced 3.3% more hen-day eggs, compared with flocks placed in houses with inside foggers and pad. Flocks kept under the system of frequent removal of manure produced 2% more hen-day eggs than flocks kept under the system for which the manure was removed less frequently. Flocks kept in farms that restricted trucks collecting dead birds from entering the premises produced 3.4% more hen-day eggs than those that allowed such trucks to enter the farm.

SUMMARY

An indexing system for hygiene variables associated with egg production was developed by use of data collected from chicken flocks in southern California. The data were analyzed by factor and regression analysis.

On the basis of our findings, hygiene index in relation to egg production consists of ventilation system, cooling system, manure removal, and truck movement. Flocks kept under natural ventilation produced, on the average, 2% more hen-day eggs than flocks kept under artificial ventilation. Flocks placed in houses with roof sprinklers produced 3.3% more hen-day eggs, compared with flocks placed in houses with inside foggers and pad. Flocks kept under the system of frequent removal of manure produced 2% more hen-day eggs than flocks kept under the system for which the manure was removed less frequently. Flocks kept in farms that restricted trucks collecting dead birds from entering the premises produced 3.4% more hen-day eggs than those that allowed such trucks to enter the farm.

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