Colonization control of lactose-fermenting Salmonella typhimurium in young broiler chickens by use of dietary lactose

Richard L. Ziprin From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Richard L. Ziprin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Marcel H. Elissalde From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Marcel H. Elissalde in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Arthur Hinton Jr. From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Arthur Hinton Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Ross C. Beier From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Ross C. Beier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
George E. Spates From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by George E. Spates in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS
,
Donald E. Corrier From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Donald E. Corrier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Thomas G. Benoit From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by Thomas G. Benoit in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
John R. DeLoach From the US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, Rt 5, Box 810, College Station, TX 77845.

Search for other papers by John R. DeLoach in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

Inclusion of lactose in the diets of chickens has been determined to reduce cecal colonization with Salmonella typhimurium. We hypothesized, therefore, that dietary lactose may be a practical means for reducing the prevalence of Salmonella contamination of chicken products. Because some strains of Salmonella are atypical and ferment lactose, we investigated the effects of dietary lactose on cecal colonization with lactose-fermenting S typhimurium. Broiler chicks were inoculated intracloacally with Lac+ S typhimurium selected for resistance to novobiocin and rifampicin. The chicks also were inoculated orally with certain anaerobes that do not effectively inhibit colonization by S typhimurium, but do appear essential for lactose mediated inhibition of cecal colonization. Control chicks were not given dietary lactose, and chicks in the experimental group were fed a diet containing 7% lactose. Enumeration of Lac+ S typhimurium in cecal contents revealed dietary lactose to be effective at controlling this organism. Control was correlated with changes in cecal pH and increases in undissociated volatile fatty acids, especially propionic acid.

SUMMARY

Inclusion of lactose in the diets of chickens has been determined to reduce cecal colonization with Salmonella typhimurium. We hypothesized, therefore, that dietary lactose may be a practical means for reducing the prevalence of Salmonella contamination of chicken products. Because some strains of Salmonella are atypical and ferment lactose, we investigated the effects of dietary lactose on cecal colonization with lactose-fermenting S typhimurium. Broiler chicks were inoculated intracloacally with Lac+ S typhimurium selected for resistance to novobiocin and rifampicin. The chicks also were inoculated orally with certain anaerobes that do not effectively inhibit colonization by S typhimurium, but do appear essential for lactose mediated inhibition of cecal colonization. Control chicks were not given dietary lactose, and chicks in the experimental group were fed a diet containing 7% lactose. Enumeration of Lac+ S typhimurium in cecal contents revealed dietary lactose to be effective at controlling this organism. Control was correlated with changes in cecal pH and increases in undissociated volatile fatty acids, especially propionic acid.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 59 59 12
PDF Downloads 37 37 8
Advertisement