Use of embryonating eggs for isolation of Campylobacter species from intestines of swine with proliferative enteritis

Gilbert E. Ward From the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Karin J. Harp From the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Gary F. Jones From the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

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SUMMARY

Intestinal tissues from swine affected with proliferative enteritis were ground, filtered through a 0.65-μm pore membrane filter, diluted, and injected into 7-day-old embryonated hens’ eggs via the yolk sac. At 2, 4, and 7 days later, yolk sac swab specimens taken from live embryos were cultured for Campylobacter species. Campylobacter hyointestinalis was recovered from eggs injected with tissues of swine with acute hemorrhagic proliferative enteritis at dilutions up to 10−4. Campylobacter mucosalis was recovered from eggs injected with tissues of swine with chronic proliferative enteritis at dilutions up to 10−6. Campylobacter coli was recovered from several specimens without lesions of proliferative enteritis and also from some specimens with lesions of proliferative enteritis. Two previously undescribed hemolytic Campylobacter species designed as hemolytic number 1 and hemolytic number 2 were recovered from normal and experimentally inoculated swine tissues. Few contaminating organisms grow in eggs and these were usually recovered at dilutions of 10−2 or less. Recovery of Campylobacter species by use of these techniques was seldom successful in tissues stored at −70 C for more than 6 months.

SUMMARY

Intestinal tissues from swine affected with proliferative enteritis were ground, filtered through a 0.65-μm pore membrane filter, diluted, and injected into 7-day-old embryonated hens’ eggs via the yolk sac. At 2, 4, and 7 days later, yolk sac swab specimens taken from live embryos were cultured for Campylobacter species. Campylobacter hyointestinalis was recovered from eggs injected with tissues of swine with acute hemorrhagic proliferative enteritis at dilutions up to 10−4. Campylobacter mucosalis was recovered from eggs injected with tissues of swine with chronic proliferative enteritis at dilutions up to 10−6. Campylobacter coli was recovered from several specimens without lesions of proliferative enteritis and also from some specimens with lesions of proliferative enteritis. Two previously undescribed hemolytic Campylobacter species designed as hemolytic number 1 and hemolytic number 2 were recovered from normal and experimentally inoculated swine tissues. Few contaminating organisms grow in eggs and these were usually recovered at dilutions of 10−2 or less. Recovery of Campylobacter species by use of these techniques was seldom successful in tissues stored at −70 C for more than 6 months.

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