Hepatic ultrasonography and blood changes in cattle with experimentally induced hepatic abscesses

K. F. Lechtenberg From the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, PhD
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T. G. Nagaraja From the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 MVSc, PhD

SUMMARY

Hepatic abscesses were induced experimentally in 5 steers by inoculating Fusobacterium necrophorum via ultrasonography-guided, percutaneous catheterization of the portal vein. Hepatic ultrasonography was performed to determine the onset and progression of abscessation. Blood samples were collected before and after inoculation for performing leukocyte counts and hepatic function tests. Ultrasonographic evidence of liver abscesses was observed as early as 3 days after inoculation. Abscesses appeared as hyperechoic centers (cellular debris and pus) surrounded by hypoechoic or anechoic areas (fluid). Increases in rectal temperature, leukocyte counts, fibrinogen, globulin, bilirubin, γ-glutamyltransferase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase concentrations were detected. Hepatic dysfunction was evidenced by decrease in serum albumin concentration and low sulfobromophthalein clearance. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of abscesses correlated well with necropsy findings.

SUMMARY

Hepatic abscesses were induced experimentally in 5 steers by inoculating Fusobacterium necrophorum via ultrasonography-guided, percutaneous catheterization of the portal vein. Hepatic ultrasonography was performed to determine the onset and progression of abscessation. Blood samples were collected before and after inoculation for performing leukocyte counts and hepatic function tests. Ultrasonographic evidence of liver abscesses was observed as early as 3 days after inoculation. Abscesses appeared as hyperechoic centers (cellular debris and pus) surrounded by hypoechoic or anechoic areas (fluid). Increases in rectal temperature, leukocyte counts, fibrinogen, globulin, bilirubin, γ-glutamyltransferase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase concentrations were detected. Hepatic dysfunction was evidenced by decrease in serum albumin concentration and low sulfobromophthalein clearance. The ultrasonographic diagnosis of abscesses correlated well with necropsy findings.

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