Fungal flora of the coat of pet cats

Karen A. Moriello From the Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706.

Search for other papers by Karen A. Moriello in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
and
Douglas J. DeBoer From the Department of Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706.

Search for other papers by Douglas J. DeBoer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

The fungal flora of the coat of 172 healthy pet cats was examined qualitatively. Fungi were isolated from 136 (79%) of the 172 cats. Fifteen genera were isolated; 13 are commonly regarded as saprophytes, and 2 (Microsporum and Trichophyton) are commonly regarded as pathogens. Aspergillus, Alternaria, Penicillium, and Cladosporium spp were the most frequently isolated saprophytes. Dermatophytic fungi, including Microsporum gypseum (n = 1), M vanbreuseghemii (n = 1), and Trichophyton rubrum (n = 14), were recovered from 16 cats. Microsporum canis was not isolated from any cat during this study.

SUMMARY

The fungal flora of the coat of 172 healthy pet cats was examined qualitatively. Fungi were isolated from 136 (79%) of the 172 cats. Fifteen genera were isolated; 13 are commonly regarded as saprophytes, and 2 (Microsporum and Trichophyton) are commonly regarded as pathogens. Aspergillus, Alternaria, Penicillium, and Cladosporium spp were the most frequently isolated saprophytes. Dermatophytic fungi, including Microsporum gypseum (n = 1), M vanbreuseghemii (n = 1), and Trichophyton rubrum (n = 14), were recovered from 16 cats. Microsporum canis was not isolated from any cat during this study.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 126 126 21
PDF Downloads 119 119 23
Advertisement