Use of pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography to determine aortic and pulmonary velocity and flow variables in clinically normal dogs

Donald J. Brown From the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109 (Brown), the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (Knight), and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, J-126 Health Science Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (King).

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 DVM, MSE
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David H. Knight From the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109 (Brown), the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (Knight), and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, J-126 Health Science Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (King).

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 DVM, MS
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Robert R. King From the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml 48109 (Brown), the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (Knight), and the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, J-126 Health Science Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (King).

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 DVM, PhD

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SUMMARY

Transcutaneous pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was used to obtain velocity signals from the aortic and pulmonary roots of clinically normal adult dogs tranquilized with acepromazine. Doppler-derived variables included peak ejection velocity, ejection time, and velocity-time integral. The cross-sectional areas of the left and right ventricular outflow tracts were estimated from diameters of the respective orifices measured from two-dimensional echocardiographic images. These data were used to calculate stroke volume and cardiac output for each ventricle. Linear, single variable regressions of ejection time, velocity-time integral, and peak velocity with body weight showed no significant correlations. Significant correlations existed between body weight and estimated left and right ventricular stroke volume and cardiac output. A close correspondence existed between pulmonary and aortic determinations of velocity-time integral, stroke volume, and cardiac output. These results provide an initial framework for interpretation of clinical data by veterinary cardiologists.

SUMMARY

Transcutaneous pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was used to obtain velocity signals from the aortic and pulmonary roots of clinically normal adult dogs tranquilized with acepromazine. Doppler-derived variables included peak ejection velocity, ejection time, and velocity-time integral. The cross-sectional areas of the left and right ventricular outflow tracts were estimated from diameters of the respective orifices measured from two-dimensional echocardiographic images. These data were used to calculate stroke volume and cardiac output for each ventricle. Linear, single variable regressions of ejection time, velocity-time integral, and peak velocity with body weight showed no significant correlations. Significant correlations existed between body weight and estimated left and right ventricular stroke volume and cardiac output. A close correspondence existed between pulmonary and aortic determinations of velocity-time integral, stroke volume, and cardiac output. These results provide an initial framework for interpretation of clinical data by veterinary cardiologists.

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