In vitro transport of cycloleucine by equine cecal mucosa

David E. Freeman From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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 MVB, PhD
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William J. Donawick From the Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

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SUMMARY

Mucosa obtained from the cecum of healthy horses and incubated in vitro with 0.1 mM cycloleucine could accumulate this amino acid against an apparent concentration gradient after 60 and 120 minutes. Accumulation by the serosal (antiluminal) surface of the tissue was 3 times greater than accumulation by the mucosal (luminal) surface after 120 minutes (P < 0.001). Cycloleucine accumulation was significantly reduced by Na deprivation after 60 minutes (P< 0.05) and 120 minutes (P < 0.01) and by anoxic conditions after 120 minutes (P < 0.05). Transmucosal flux from mucosal to serosal surface of the tissue was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than the opposing flux, but both unidirectional fluxes were small and were largely attributed to passive processes. It was concluded that the most avid transport system for cycloleucine was on the serosal surface of the horse's cecal mucosa, and an active transport system was not evident on the mucosal surface. An active transport system for amino acids on the serosal surface could be explained by the need for crypt cells, the predominant epithelial cell type in the cecum, to obtain nutrients from blood, rather than from the intestinal lumen.

SUMMARY

Mucosa obtained from the cecum of healthy horses and incubated in vitro with 0.1 mM cycloleucine could accumulate this amino acid against an apparent concentration gradient after 60 and 120 minutes. Accumulation by the serosal (antiluminal) surface of the tissue was 3 times greater than accumulation by the mucosal (luminal) surface after 120 minutes (P < 0.001). Cycloleucine accumulation was significantly reduced by Na deprivation after 60 minutes (P< 0.05) and 120 minutes (P < 0.01) and by anoxic conditions after 120 minutes (P < 0.05). Transmucosal flux from mucosal to serosal surface of the tissue was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than the opposing flux, but both unidirectional fluxes were small and were largely attributed to passive processes. It was concluded that the most avid transport system for cycloleucine was on the serosal surface of the horse's cecal mucosa, and an active transport system was not evident on the mucosal surface. An active transport system for amino acids on the serosal surface could be explained by the need for crypt cells, the predominant epithelial cell type in the cecum, to obtain nutrients from blood, rather than from the intestinal lumen.

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