Effect of method of seminal collection on the retrograde flow of spermatozoa into the urinary bladder of rams

M. H. Pineda From the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250.

Search for other papers by M. H. Pineda in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
and
M. P. Dooley From the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250.

Search for other papers by M. P. Dooley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

The effects of method of seminal collection and a diuretic on retrograde flow of spermatozoa into the urinary bladder of rams were examined. In experiment 1, semen and urine were collected from 8 rams during the non-breeding season. Prior to seminal collection, all rams were given furosemide and a sample of urine was obtained during micturition. Semen was then collected from each ram with an artificial vagina or by electroejaculation in alternate weeks for 4 weeks, and the urine released during the first postseminal collection micturition was collected in 4 consecutive samples. The volume of electroejaculates was larger (P < 0.0001) than the volume of ejaculates, but the total number of spermatozoa in the electroejaculate or in the ejaculate were not different (P > 0.1). Urine obtained before seminal collection was azoospermic or contained few, nonmotile spermatozoa (mean ± sd = 0.053 ± 0.114 × 106/ml). The adjusted spermatozoal concentration (mean ± sd = 1.630 ± 2.258 × 106/ml) in the urine collected after seminal collection was 31 times higher (P < 0.0001) and there were motile spermatozoa in most (97%) of the samples. The spermatozoal concentration in sequential samples of urine was not different (P > 0.1) between samples and was not affected (P > 0.1) by the method of seminal collection. There was a trend, approaching significance (P = 0.052), for an effect of method of seminal collection on the percentage of retrograde flow. Retrograde flow ranged from 0.21 to 19.38% when semen was collected with an artificial vagina and from 0.03 to 94.60% when semen was collected by electroejaculation and varied (P = 0.02) among rams within the 2 methods of seminal collection. In experiment 2, the 8 rams used in experiment 1 were given injections of 0.9% physiologic saline solution or furosemide in alternate weeks prior to seminal collection with an artificial vagina. Furosemide increased (P = 0.009) the volume of urine voided during the first postejaculation micturition, but did not influence (P > 0.1) the time from exposure of rams to the teaser to ejaculation, seminal characteristics, number of spermatozoa in the urine, or the percentage of retrograde flow. There was a trend (P < 0.1) for more rams to have motile spermatozoa in the postejaculation urine after treatment with furosemide. Administration of furosemide prior to seminal collection facilitates the noninvasive collection of pre- and postejaculation samples of urine for the determination of retrograde flow.

SUMMARY

The effects of method of seminal collection and a diuretic on retrograde flow of spermatozoa into the urinary bladder of rams were examined. In experiment 1, semen and urine were collected from 8 rams during the non-breeding season. Prior to seminal collection, all rams were given furosemide and a sample of urine was obtained during micturition. Semen was then collected from each ram with an artificial vagina or by electroejaculation in alternate weeks for 4 weeks, and the urine released during the first postseminal collection micturition was collected in 4 consecutive samples. The volume of electroejaculates was larger (P < 0.0001) than the volume of ejaculates, but the total number of spermatozoa in the electroejaculate or in the ejaculate were not different (P > 0.1). Urine obtained before seminal collection was azoospermic or contained few, nonmotile spermatozoa (mean ± sd = 0.053 ± 0.114 × 106/ml). The adjusted spermatozoal concentration (mean ± sd = 1.630 ± 2.258 × 106/ml) in the urine collected after seminal collection was 31 times higher (P < 0.0001) and there were motile spermatozoa in most (97%) of the samples. The spermatozoal concentration in sequential samples of urine was not different (P > 0.1) between samples and was not affected (P > 0.1) by the method of seminal collection. There was a trend, approaching significance (P = 0.052), for an effect of method of seminal collection on the percentage of retrograde flow. Retrograde flow ranged from 0.21 to 19.38% when semen was collected with an artificial vagina and from 0.03 to 94.60% when semen was collected by electroejaculation and varied (P = 0.02) among rams within the 2 methods of seminal collection. In experiment 2, the 8 rams used in experiment 1 were given injections of 0.9% physiologic saline solution or furosemide in alternate weeks prior to seminal collection with an artificial vagina. Furosemide increased (P = 0.009) the volume of urine voided during the first postejaculation micturition, but did not influence (P > 0.1) the time from exposure of rams to the teaser to ejaculation, seminal characteristics, number of spermatozoa in the urine, or the percentage of retrograde flow. There was a trend (P < 0.1) for more rams to have motile spermatozoa in the postejaculation urine after treatment with furosemide. Administration of furosemide prior to seminal collection facilitates the noninvasive collection of pre- and postejaculation samples of urine for the determination of retrograde flow.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 48 48 10
PDF Downloads 16 16 5
Advertisement