Cutaneous laser-Doppler velocimetry in nine animal species

Thomas O. Manning From Cutaneous Pharmacology and Toxicology Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Nancy A. Monteiro-Riviere From Cutaneous Pharmacology and Toxicology Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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David G. Bristol From Cutaneous Pharmacology and Toxicology Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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J. Edmond Riviere From Cutaneous Pharmacology and Toxicology Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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SUMMARY

The assessment of cutaneous microcirculation by laser-Doppler velocimetry (ldv) has been primarily limited to human studies. The purpose of this investigation was to establish normal values in various species and anatomic sites for blood flow, velocity, and volume as determined by ldv. Microcirculation was measured with a laser-Doppler velocimeter in 54 animals, 6 healthy animals from each of 9 species. The standard sites used were the buttocks, convex surface of the ear, metacarpal pad, humeroscapular junction, thoracolumbar junction, ventral portion of the abdomen, dorsal metacarpus (hooved animals), and ventral surface of the tail (horse). Significant differences in blood flow, velocity, and volume were measured between species and sites within species. The ventral portion of the abdomen consistently had the highest relative blood flow across all species except the monkey. Measurements in the canine metacarpal pad had a high sd, possibly indicating the stratum corneum and epidermis to be too thick for ldv. Our findings provide baseline data in several species, with application of ldv in comparative dermatologic research.

SUMMARY

The assessment of cutaneous microcirculation by laser-Doppler velocimetry (ldv) has been primarily limited to human studies. The purpose of this investigation was to establish normal values in various species and anatomic sites for blood flow, velocity, and volume as determined by ldv. Microcirculation was measured with a laser-Doppler velocimeter in 54 animals, 6 healthy animals from each of 9 species. The standard sites used were the buttocks, convex surface of the ear, metacarpal pad, humeroscapular junction, thoracolumbar junction, ventral portion of the abdomen, dorsal metacarpus (hooved animals), and ventral surface of the tail (horse). Significant differences in blood flow, velocity, and volume were measured between species and sites within species. The ventral portion of the abdomen consistently had the highest relative blood flow across all species except the monkey. Measurements in the canine metacarpal pad had a high sd, possibly indicating the stratum corneum and epidermis to be too thick for ldv. Our findings provide baseline data in several species, with application of ldv in comparative dermatologic research.

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