Effect of a passive heat and moisture exchanger on esophageal temperature in tumor-bearing dogs during whole-body hyperthermia

Robert E. Meyer From the Departments of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences, and Radiology (Meyer, Thrall) and Companion Animals and Special Species (Page), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Rodney L. Page From the Departments of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences, and Radiology (Meyer, Thrall) and Companion Animals and Special Species (Page), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Donald E. Thrall From the Departments of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences, and Radiology (Meyer, Thrall) and Companion Animals and Special Species (Page), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 4700 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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SUMMARY

The effect of a passive heat and moisture exchanger on tracheal and large airway temperature, as reflected by esophageal temperature at the thoracic inlet, was determined for 12 anesthetized and ventilated tumor-bearing dogs undergoing whole-body hyperthermia at 42 C. Delivered thermal dose to the esophagus and rectum during 120 minutes of whole-body hyperthermia was quantified as the thermal dose summary measure EQ43. The heat and moisture exchanger significantly increased esophageal EQ43 from 7.3 minutes to 12.1 minutes. Esophageal EQ43, however, remained lower than rectal EQ43. Although use of a heat and moisture exchanger improved esophageal temperature during whole-body hyperthermia, presumably through improved airway temperature, additional methods will be necessary to increase esophageal and airway temperature to the target value of 42 C.

SUMMARY

The effect of a passive heat and moisture exchanger on tracheal and large airway temperature, as reflected by esophageal temperature at the thoracic inlet, was determined for 12 anesthetized and ventilated tumor-bearing dogs undergoing whole-body hyperthermia at 42 C. Delivered thermal dose to the esophagus and rectum during 120 minutes of whole-body hyperthermia was quantified as the thermal dose summary measure EQ43. The heat and moisture exchanger significantly increased esophageal EQ43 from 7.3 minutes to 12.1 minutes. Esophageal EQ43, however, remained lower than rectal EQ43. Although use of a heat and moisture exchanger improved esophageal temperature during whole-body hyperthermia, presumably through improved airway temperature, additional methods will be necessary to increase esophageal and airway temperature to the target value of 42 C.

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