Electrophoretic profiles of Pasteurella multocida isolates from animals with hemorrhagic septicemia

Ronald B. Johnson From the Department of Agriculture, Benulla Agricultural and Veterinary Centre, PO Box 388 Benalla, Victoria 3672, Australia.

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Hugh J. S. Dawkins From the Department of Agriculture, Benulla Agricultural and Veterinary Centre, PO Box 388 Benalla, Victoria 3672, Australia.

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Terence L. Spencer From the Department of Agriculture, Benulla Agricultural and Veterinary Centre, PO Box 388 Benalla, Victoria 3672, Australia.

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SUMMARY

We determined that the protein profiles of 14 isolates from animals with hemorrhagic septicemia were relatively homogeneous and could be placed in 2 distinct groups on the basis of their country of origin. Such differences correlated with the serotypic properties of the individual isolates; hemorrhagic septicemia isolates of Asian and North American origin (Carter B) had a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 32 kDa, whereas those of African origins (Carter E) had a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa. The possession of a major 32-kDa protein band appeared to be unique to Carter B isolates, suggesting that electrophoresis may be a useful nonserologic technique for the identification of organisms of this serotype. Other major bands with apparent molecular masses of 27, 45, and 47 kDa were shared by all strains, regardless of their serotype. The lipopolysaccharides were of low molecular mass and relatively uniform from 1 isolate to the next.

SUMMARY

We determined that the protein profiles of 14 isolates from animals with hemorrhagic septicemia were relatively homogeneous and could be placed in 2 distinct groups on the basis of their country of origin. Such differences correlated with the serotypic properties of the individual isolates; hemorrhagic septicemia isolates of Asian and North American origin (Carter B) had a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 32 kDa, whereas those of African origins (Carter E) had a major protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 37 kDa. The possession of a major 32-kDa protein band appeared to be unique to Carter B isolates, suggesting that electrophoresis may be a useful nonserologic technique for the identification of organisms of this serotype. Other major bands with apparent molecular masses of 27, 45, and 47 kDa were shared by all strains, regardless of their serotype. The lipopolysaccharides were of low molecular mass and relatively uniform from 1 isolate to the next.

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