Urine metabolite values in fed and nonfed clinically normal Beagles

Jody P. Lulich From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 (Lulich, Osborne, Polzin, Johnston), and Urochemistry Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77005 (Parker).

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Carl A. Osborne From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 (Lulich, Osborne, Polzin, Johnston), and Urochemistry Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77005 (Parker).

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David J. Polzin From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 (Lulich, Osborne, Polzin, Johnston), and Urochemistry Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77005 (Parker).

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Shirley D. Johnston From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 (Lulich, Osborne, Polzin, Johnston), and Urochemistry Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77005 (Parker).

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Mary Lou Parker From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1352 Boyd Ave, St Paul, MN 55108 (Lulich, Osborne, Polzin, Johnston), and Urochemistry Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77005 (Parker).

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SUMMARY

Twenty-four-hour excretion of urine metabolites was determined in 33 clinically normal Beagles during periods of consumption of a standard diet and when food was withheld. The goal was to determine normal canine values for urine analytes incriminated in the genesis of calcium oxalate uroliths.

During periods when dogs consumed food, dairy urinary excretion of calcium, uric acid, sodium, potassium, magnesium, ammonium, and hydrogen ions were significantly (P = 0.0004, 0.0038, 0.001, 0.0001, 0.0004, 0.0001, and 0.024, respectively) higher than when food was withheld. Urinary excretion of phosphorus, oxalate, and citrate were not significantly different between samples obtained during periods of food consumption and when food was withheld. Male dogs excreted significantly higher quantities of urine oxalate than females during fed (P = 0.003) and nonfed (P = 0.003) conditions. When food was withheld, urinary uric acid excretion was significantly higher in males than females (P = 0.01). Females excreted significantly more urine calcium than males when food was withheld (P = 0.003). Our results indicated that dietary conditions influence the quantity of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and uric acid excreted in the urine of clinically normal dogs; therefore, dietary conditions should be considered when measuring the concentration of these analytes in urine.

SUMMARY

Twenty-four-hour excretion of urine metabolites was determined in 33 clinically normal Beagles during periods of consumption of a standard diet and when food was withheld. The goal was to determine normal canine values for urine analytes incriminated in the genesis of calcium oxalate uroliths.

During periods when dogs consumed food, dairy urinary excretion of calcium, uric acid, sodium, potassium, magnesium, ammonium, and hydrogen ions were significantly (P = 0.0004, 0.0038, 0.001, 0.0001, 0.0004, 0.0001, and 0.024, respectively) higher than when food was withheld. Urinary excretion of phosphorus, oxalate, and citrate were not significantly different between samples obtained during periods of food consumption and when food was withheld. Male dogs excreted significantly higher quantities of urine oxalate than females during fed (P = 0.003) and nonfed (P = 0.003) conditions. When food was withheld, urinary uric acid excretion was significantly higher in males than females (P = 0.01). Females excreted significantly more urine calcium than males when food was withheld (P = 0.003). Our results indicated that dietary conditions influence the quantity of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and uric acid excreted in the urine of clinically normal dogs; therefore, dietary conditions should be considered when measuring the concentration of these analytes in urine.

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