Fetal membranes and ancillary structures of llamas (Lama glama)

Murray E. Fowler From the Departments of Medicine (Fowler) and Pathology (Olander), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Harvey J. Olander From the Departments of Medicine (Fowler) and Pathology (Olander), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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SUMMARY

The placenta of llamas is epitheliochorial, with patchy areas of dense folded papillation serving as the placentome. The amnion of the full-term placenta is closely adhered to either the allantois or the chorion and remains with these structures at the time of parturition.

Llamas and alpacas, like dromedaries, have an extra fetal membrane that is derived from the epidermis of the fetus. In association with the watery amniotic fluid of llamas, the epidermal membrane is slippery, facilitating delivery of the fetus.

SUMMARY

The placenta of llamas is epitheliochorial, with patchy areas of dense folded papillation serving as the placentome. The amnion of the full-term placenta is closely adhered to either the allantois or the chorion and remains with these structures at the time of parturition.

Llamas and alpacas, like dromedaries, have an extra fetal membrane that is derived from the epidermis of the fetus. In association with the watery amniotic fluid of llamas, the epidermal membrane is slippery, facilitating delivery of the fetus.

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