Serum lipid and lipoprotein changes in ponies with experimentally induced liver disease

John E. Bauer From the Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by John E. Bauer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
D. J. Meyer From the Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by D. J. Meyer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Martha Campbell From the Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Martha Campbell in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Rose McMurphy From the Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Search for other papers by Rose McMurphy in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

SUMMARY

Alterations in serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in ponies with experimentally induced liver disease were investigated. Hepatocellular damage was induced, using a nonlethal dose of carbon tetrachloride. In a separate group of ponies, obstructive jaundice was induced by surgical ligation of the common bile duct. Over a 6-day period, blood samples were obtained from ponies after treatment with carbon tetrachloride and for 12 days in ponies subjected to surgery. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were unaffected in both groups of ponies, except for significantly (P < 0.01) high triglyceride concentration in ponies of the ligated group during the second postsurgical week. This increase was most likely attributable to anorexia observed during that period. Hyperbilirubinemia was observed early in ponies of the ligated group; most of the bilirubin was of the conjugated type. Using electrophoretic and ultracentrifugal methods, serum lipoprotein alterations were detected only in ponies of the ligated group. Increases of very low-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were found. Although no changes were seen in total serum cholesterol concentration, a redistribution of lipoprotein cholesterol was observed in ponies of the ligated group. Similar alterations in lipoprotein distribution have been found in dogs, rats, and human beings with obstructive jaundice and cholestasis. The association between serum lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase activities and these lipoprotein alterations remains to be elucidated.

SUMMARY

Alterations in serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in ponies with experimentally induced liver disease were investigated. Hepatocellular damage was induced, using a nonlethal dose of carbon tetrachloride. In a separate group of ponies, obstructive jaundice was induced by surgical ligation of the common bile duct. Over a 6-day period, blood samples were obtained from ponies after treatment with carbon tetrachloride and for 12 days in ponies subjected to surgery. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were unaffected in both groups of ponies, except for significantly (P < 0.01) high triglyceride concentration in ponies of the ligated group during the second postsurgical week. This increase was most likely attributable to anorexia observed during that period. Hyperbilirubinemia was observed early in ponies of the ligated group; most of the bilirubin was of the conjugated type. Using electrophoretic and ultracentrifugal methods, serum lipoprotein alterations were detected only in ponies of the ligated group. Increases of very low-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were found. Although no changes were seen in total serum cholesterol concentration, a redistribution of lipoprotein cholesterol was observed in ponies of the ligated group. Similar alterations in lipoprotein distribution have been found in dogs, rats, and human beings with obstructive jaundice and cholestasis. The association between serum lecithin:cholesterol acyl transferase activities and these lipoprotein alterations remains to be elucidated.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 54 54 22
PDF Downloads 30 30 2
Advertisement