Blood biochemical response to sodium bicarbonate infusion during sublethal endotoxemia in ponies

K. A. Gossett From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Gossett, Cleghorn), Veterinary Science (French), and Experimental Statistics (Church), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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D. D. French From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Gossett, Cleghorn), Veterinary Science (French), and Experimental Statistics (Church), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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B. Cleghorn From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Gossett, Cleghorn), Veterinary Science (French), and Experimental Statistics (Church), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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G. E. Church From the Departments of Veterinary Pathology (Gossett, Cleghorn), Veterinary Science (French), and Experimental Statistics (Church), Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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SUMMARY

Hypertonic NaHCO3 infusion caused blood volume expansion, increased blood bicarbonate concentration, and delayed the onset of hypophosphatemia in ponies with endotoxemia. However, NaHCO3 infusion did not normalize blood pH, and it increased blood l-lactate concentration, and caused hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. The deleterious effects of NaHCO3 infusion in endotoxemic ponies outweighed the beneficial effects. The role of hypertonic NaHCO3 given iv for treatment of endotoxemia in equids must be reevaluated.

SUMMARY

Hypertonic NaHCO3 infusion caused blood volume expansion, increased blood bicarbonate concentration, and delayed the onset of hypophosphatemia in ponies with endotoxemia. However, NaHCO3 infusion did not normalize blood pH, and it increased blood l-lactate concentration, and caused hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. The deleterious effects of NaHCO3 infusion in endotoxemic ponies outweighed the beneficial effects. The role of hypertonic NaHCO3 given iv for treatment of endotoxemia in equids must be reevaluated.

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