Amplitude and latency characteristics of spinal cord motor-evoked potentials in dogs

J. R. Cook Jr. From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Cook) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Konrad, Tacker), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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 DVM, PhD
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P. E. Konrad From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Cook) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Konrad, Tacker), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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W. A. Tacker Jr. From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine (Cook) and the Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering Center (Konrad, Tacker), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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 MD, PhD

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SUMMARY

The motor-evoked potential can be reliably recorded in anesthetized dogs by use of percutaneous placement of active recording electrodes near the dorsal lamina of the vertebral column. Two types of responses were observed in this study; short (< 5.5 ms at T9-10)- and long (> 5.8 ms at T9-10)-latency waves. Short-latency waves are larger in amplitude and appear with higher stimulus intensities than do long-latency waves. Short-latency waves are conducted at > 80 m/s and may not reflect pyramidal tract activation. The safety of using higher intensity stimuli to generate short-latency waves has not been determined.

SUMMARY

The motor-evoked potential can be reliably recorded in anesthetized dogs by use of percutaneous placement of active recording electrodes near the dorsal lamina of the vertebral column. Two types of responses were observed in this study; short (< 5.5 ms at T9-10)- and long (> 5.8 ms at T9-10)-latency waves. Short-latency waves are larger in amplitude and appear with higher stimulus intensities than do long-latency waves. Short-latency waves are conducted at > 80 m/s and may not reflect pyramidal tract activation. The safety of using higher intensity stimuli to generate short-latency waves has not been determined.

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