Alteration of intestinal enzyme activities associated with extensive large-colon resection in horses

Alicia L. Bertone From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bertone, Stashak) and Physiology (Toofanian), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, PhD
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Farshid Toofanian From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bertone, Stashak) and Physiology (Toofanian), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Ted S. Stashak From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bertone, Stashak) and Physiology (Toofanian), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, MS

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SUMMARY

Lactase, maltase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were determined in the intestinal mucosa from 3 locations in the small intestine and 4 locations in the large intestine 1 year after extensive large-colon resection (group 1; n = 5) and 1 year after sham operation (group 2; n = 3) in horses.

Lactase, maltase, and sucrase activities were similar (P > 0.05) between group-1 and group-2 horses in all locations measured in the intestinal tract. Alkaline phosphatase activity in the remaining large colon of group-1 horses was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than the activity in the large colon of group-2 horses. Decreased apparent digestion of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance are persistent features of large-colon resection in horses. Increases in alkaline phosphatase activity in the remaining colon of horses with extensive large-colon resection may be a specific functional adaptive mechanism that attempts to counteract the derangements in phosphorus metabolism.

SUMMARY

Lactase, maltase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase activities were determined in the intestinal mucosa from 3 locations in the small intestine and 4 locations in the large intestine 1 year after extensive large-colon resection (group 1; n = 5) and 1 year after sham operation (group 2; n = 3) in horses.

Lactase, maltase, and sucrase activities were similar (P > 0.05) between group-1 and group-2 horses in all locations measured in the intestinal tract. Alkaline phosphatase activity in the remaining large colon of group-1 horses was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than the activity in the large colon of group-2 horses. Decreased apparent digestion of phosphorus and a negative phosphorus balance are persistent features of large-colon resection in horses. Increases in alkaline phosphatase activity in the remaining colon of horses with extensive large-colon resection may be a specific functional adaptive mechanism that attempts to counteract the derangements in phosphorus metabolism.

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