Cardiovascular and respiratory effects of inspired oxygen fraction in halothane-anesthetized horses

Sophie G. Cuvelliez From the Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.

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Steven W. Eicker From the Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.

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 MS, DVM
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Charlene McLauchlan From the Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.

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David B. Brunson From the Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.

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 MS, DVM

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SUMMARY

Anesthesia of equids is associated with pulmonary dysfunction. Cardiovascular and respiratory effects of inhalation anesthetic agents and duration of anesthesia have been studied, using oxygen as the carrier gas. To our knowledge, the effects of inspired oxygen have not been determined. We studied the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of 2 inspired oxygen fractions (0.30 and > 0.85) in 5 laterally recumbent, halothane-anesthetized horses. Mean systemic arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, arterial pH, and arterial base excess were similar in horses of the 2 groups during 4 hours of anesthesia at constant end-tidal halothane concentration. End-tidal partial pressure of CO2, arterial partial pressure of CO2 and O2, and alveolar-to-arterial O2 tension difference were greater in horses exposed to the higher oxygen concentration. On the basis of the data obtained, we suggest that greater hypoventilation and ventilation/perfusion mismatch occur when horses are breathing high-oxygen fraction. Arterial partial pressure of O2 was not different between the 2 groups of horses after they were disconnected from the anesthesia circuit and allowed to breathe room air. Horses recovered from anesthesia without complications.

SUMMARY

Anesthesia of equids is associated with pulmonary dysfunction. Cardiovascular and respiratory effects of inhalation anesthetic agents and duration of anesthesia have been studied, using oxygen as the carrier gas. To our knowledge, the effects of inspired oxygen have not been determined. We studied the cardiovascular and respiratory effects of 2 inspired oxygen fractions (0.30 and > 0.85) in 5 laterally recumbent, halothane-anesthetized horses. Mean systemic arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, arterial pH, and arterial base excess were similar in horses of the 2 groups during 4 hours of anesthesia at constant end-tidal halothane concentration. End-tidal partial pressure of CO2, arterial partial pressure of CO2 and O2, and alveolar-to-arterial O2 tension difference were greater in horses exposed to the higher oxygen concentration. On the basis of the data obtained, we suggest that greater hypoventilation and ventilation/perfusion mismatch occur when horses are breathing high-oxygen fraction. Arterial partial pressure of O2 was not different between the 2 groups of horses after they were disconnected from the anesthesia circuit and allowed to breathe room air. Horses recovered from anesthesia without complications.

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