Experimentally induced Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in selenium-deficient and selenium-supplemented dairy cows

Ronald J. Erskine From the Department of Veterinary Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

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Robert J. Eberhart From the Department of Veterinary Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

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Richard W. Scholz From the Department of Veterinary Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

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SUMMARY

Ten Holstein cows were fed a selenium-deficient (SeD) diet containing 0.04 mg of Se/kg of dry matter for 3 months before and throughout their first lactation. A selenium-supplemented (SeS) group of 10 cows was fed an additional 2 mg of Se/head/d to increase dietary Se concentration of the dry matter to approximately 0.14 mg/kg of body weight. An intracisternal challenge exposure of 40 to 60 colony-forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus was administered into 1 or 2 quarters of the udder of each trial cow at about the twenty-second week of lactation. Blood Se concentration (μg/ml±sem) at the time of challenge exposure was 0.035±0.002 in SeD and 0.139±0.006 in SeS cows. Infections were established in 14/16 of the challenge-exposed quarters in SeD and 16/19 of the challenge-exposed quarters in SeS cows. The infection in 1 quarter of each Se group cleared without treatment by the end of the 8-week trial period.

Log10 peak bacterial concentrations in milk from infected SeD quarters (5.04±0.25 cfu/ml) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of infected SeS quarters (4.40±0.12 cfu/ml). Log10 peak somatic cell count (scc) in milk from infected SeD quarters (7.18±0.08 cells/ml) did not differ from that of SeS quarters (7.17±0.05 cells/ml). Peak bacterial concentrations were attained sooner (P < 0.05) in SeD quarters (9.5±4.0 days) than in SeS quarters (20.7±3.1 days). Similarly, peak scc were reached earlier (P < 0.05) in SeD (4.3±1.1 days) than in SeS quarters (13.3±3.8 days). The Se groups did not differ significantly with respect to peak milk concentrations of bovine serum albumin or IgGl. Throughout the 8-week trial, the Se groups did not differ significantly in milk bacterial concentration, scc, bovine serum albumin, or IgGl. Selenium status did not affect the percentage of challenge exposures resulting in infection, duration, or severity of experimentally induced S aureus mastitis.

SUMMARY

Ten Holstein cows were fed a selenium-deficient (SeD) diet containing 0.04 mg of Se/kg of dry matter for 3 months before and throughout their first lactation. A selenium-supplemented (SeS) group of 10 cows was fed an additional 2 mg of Se/head/d to increase dietary Se concentration of the dry matter to approximately 0.14 mg/kg of body weight. An intracisternal challenge exposure of 40 to 60 colony-forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus was administered into 1 or 2 quarters of the udder of each trial cow at about the twenty-second week of lactation. Blood Se concentration (μg/ml±sem) at the time of challenge exposure was 0.035±0.002 in SeD and 0.139±0.006 in SeS cows. Infections were established in 14/16 of the challenge-exposed quarters in SeD and 16/19 of the challenge-exposed quarters in SeS cows. The infection in 1 quarter of each Se group cleared without treatment by the end of the 8-week trial period.

Log10 peak bacterial concentrations in milk from infected SeD quarters (5.04±0.25 cfu/ml) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of infected SeS quarters (4.40±0.12 cfu/ml). Log10 peak somatic cell count (scc) in milk from infected SeD quarters (7.18±0.08 cells/ml) did not differ from that of SeS quarters (7.17±0.05 cells/ml). Peak bacterial concentrations were attained sooner (P < 0.05) in SeD quarters (9.5±4.0 days) than in SeS quarters (20.7±3.1 days). Similarly, peak scc were reached earlier (P < 0.05) in SeD (4.3±1.1 days) than in SeS quarters (13.3±3.8 days). The Se groups did not differ significantly with respect to peak milk concentrations of bovine serum albumin or IgGl. Throughout the 8-week trial, the Se groups did not differ significantly in milk bacterial concentration, scc, bovine serum albumin, or IgGl. Selenium status did not affect the percentage of challenge exposures resulting in infection, duration, or severity of experimentally induced S aureus mastitis.

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