Chromogenic assay for equine plasminogen

Elizabeth G. Welles From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Welles, Prasse), and the Department of Pathology, Grady Memorial Hospital, 80 Butler St, Atlanta, GA 30335 (Duncan).

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Keith W. Prasse From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Welles, Prasse), and the Department of Pathology, Grady Memorial Hospital, 80 Butler St, Atlanta, GA 30335 (Duncan).

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Alexander Duncan From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Welles, Prasse), and the Department of Pathology, Grady Memorial Hospital, 80 Butler St, Atlanta, GA 30335 (Duncan).

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SUMMARY

A functional assay for equine plasminogen was established, using urokinase as the activator, a synthetic chromogenic substrate, a computer-assisted centrifugal analyzer, and acidified/neutralized plasma. One documented effect of plasma acidification appears to be inactivation of alpha-2-antiplasmin. Intra- and interassay precision testing yielded coefficients of variation of 4.1% (n = 10) and 5.6% (n = 26), respectively. Plasminogen was stable in equine plasma stored up to 1 week at 4 C and up to 5 months at − 70 C. Plasminogen in nonacidified equine plasma was not activated by urokinase, streptokinase, tissue plasminogen activator, or tissue plasminogen activator plus soluble fibrin. Streptokinase also failed to activate plasminogen in acidified/neutralized equine plasma.

SUMMARY

A functional assay for equine plasminogen was established, using urokinase as the activator, a synthetic chromogenic substrate, a computer-assisted centrifugal analyzer, and acidified/neutralized plasma. One documented effect of plasma acidification appears to be inactivation of alpha-2-antiplasmin. Intra- and interassay precision testing yielded coefficients of variation of 4.1% (n = 10) and 5.6% (n = 26), respectively. Plasminogen was stable in equine plasma stored up to 1 week at 4 C and up to 5 months at − 70 C. Plasminogen in nonacidified equine plasma was not activated by urokinase, streptokinase, tissue plasminogen activator, or tissue plasminogen activator plus soluble fibrin. Streptokinase also failed to activate plasminogen in acidified/neutralized equine plasma.

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