Partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, pH, and concentrations of bicarbonate, lactate, and glucose in pleural fluid from horses

Gordon W. Brumbaugh From the Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Brumbaugh) and Pathology (Benson), Texas Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Patricia A. Benson From the Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Brumbaugh) and Pathology (Benson), Texas Veterinary Medical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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SUMMARY

Samples of pleural fluid from 20 horses with effusive pleural diseases of various causes were evaluated; samples from 19 horses were used for the study. There were differences for pH (P = 0.001) and partial pressure of oxygen (Po2) between arterial blood and nonseptic pleural fluid (P = 0.0491), but there were no differences for pH, Po2, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2), and concentrations of bicarbonate (HCO3-), lactate, and glucose between venous blood and nonseptic pleural fluid. Paired comparisons of venous blood and nonseptic pleural fluid from the same horse indicated no differences.

There were differences (P = 0.0001, each) for pH, Po2, Pco2, and concentrations of HCO3- between arterial blood and septic pleural fluid. Differences also existed for pH (P = 0.0001), Pco2 (P = 0.0003), and concentrations of HCO3- (P = 0.0001), lactate (P = 0.0051), and glucose (P = 0.0001) between venous blood and septic pleural fluid. Difference was not found for values of Po2 between venous blood and septic pleural fluid, although 4 samples of septic pleural fluid contained virtually no oxygen. Paired comparisons of venous blood and septic pleural fluid from the same horse revealed differences (P < 0.05) for all values, except those for Po2.

These alterations suggested functional and physical compartmentalization that separated septic and healthy tissue. Compartmentalization and microenvironmental factors at the site of infection should be considered when developing therapeutic strategies for horses with septic pleural disease.

SUMMARY

Samples of pleural fluid from 20 horses with effusive pleural diseases of various causes were evaluated; samples from 19 horses were used for the study. There were differences for pH (P = 0.001) and partial pressure of oxygen (Po2) between arterial blood and nonseptic pleural fluid (P = 0.0491), but there were no differences for pH, Po2, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco2), and concentrations of bicarbonate (HCO3-), lactate, and glucose between venous blood and nonseptic pleural fluid. Paired comparisons of venous blood and nonseptic pleural fluid from the same horse indicated no differences.

There were differences (P = 0.0001, each) for pH, Po2, Pco2, and concentrations of HCO3- between arterial blood and septic pleural fluid. Differences also existed for pH (P = 0.0001), Pco2 (P = 0.0003), and concentrations of HCO3- (P = 0.0001), lactate (P = 0.0051), and glucose (P = 0.0001) between venous blood and septic pleural fluid. Difference was not found for values of Po2 between venous blood and septic pleural fluid, although 4 samples of septic pleural fluid contained virtually no oxygen. Paired comparisons of venous blood and septic pleural fluid from the same horse revealed differences (P < 0.05) for all values, except those for Po2.

These alterations suggested functional and physical compartmentalization that separated septic and healthy tissue. Compartmentalization and microenvironmental factors at the site of infection should be considered when developing therapeutic strategies for horses with septic pleural disease.

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